Worth the wait?

After nearly ten years, the olive tree has started bearing fruit. Just a few last year, that never grew beyond the size of a currant. This year, they’ve survived the winter and are almost the size of the black olives I like. The birds have had a few pecks of them and spat them on the ground, so I guess they probably taste horrid.

I read somewhere that olives are cured for eating, I’ve no idea what with of how, but I expect they need a whole lot more heat and sun to be enjoyable. Some of you are in olive producing countries, perhaps you could tell me more?

Advertisements

16 thoughts on “Worth the wait?

  1. We had an olive tree when we lived in France, and I can tell you that the fruits were just …. vile. How anyone ever worked out that with time, t-l-c and skill they could turn into the wonderful products we all all love to use is beyond me.

  2. I used to try to pickle mine olives many many years ago.(I had four healthy trees)
    Unless you have heaps of olives I don’t think the hassle is worth it. We used to pick ours when green, not black/ripe like yours are. then the olives were washed and placed in a strong brine solution…but it is easier to give you a link 🙂
    http://www.oliveaustralia.com.au/Pickling_your_Olives/pickling_your_olives.html
    My Italian friends despaired of me and my attempts and I stuck to buying the commercially prepared olives.
    Have FUN!

  3. They look beautiful. I think you should at least take a tiny taste of one. You’ll never know for sure unless you do. And surely there’s information online about picking and preparing them. I don’t know anything about them except that I love them — green or black — but then I’ve had only the ones I buy in a store.

  4. Labour intensive as I remember: brine needed to be changed more often than we actually got round to changing it. A Greek friend in Broken Hill had it down to a fine art – it involved vats, brine and (if I remember right ) an egg in its shell floated to calibrate the density of the brine. As an aside, Broken Hill ended up producing gourmet oil from 850 trees grown by a cooperative in a former sludge pit.

      1. For all my beach nostalgia, no! I’ve been a bit daunted by spacing ss and urgent things to do – like get the car registered. However, today’s the day, so I’ll send you prospective sandy hugs.

I would love to hear from you . . .

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s