Black and white Sunday

I’ve missed a few of my favourite challenges recently, including Paula’s Black and White Sunday, but I can’t resist texture, so I’m squeezing a few minutes to share this photo.

Plants aren’t something I’d usually pick for black and white and a butterfly, never before, but I think it works, do you?

Advertisements

Thursday Special, park musings

In 1987, when the ‘Great Storm’ ravaged many parts of the UK, lots of great trees were damaged or lost completely in Heavitree Park. This is the park where I grew up, part of my daily walk to school through infant and junior school years, and a place full of memories both good and bad.

My children also played there in the late 80’s, and we walked Jassy, the family dog, a golden get-it-yourself. Over time, new trees were planted, some of which are now fully grown. Grandchildren have played there, Dido and Daisy walked there for 13 years, and now it’s Flora and George’s turn.

Time passes, fall arrives every year bringing short days and damp weather. In the park several more trees have fallen over the years and have been given a new lease of life. Like this meeting bench standing near the skate park, it’s somewhere for the kids to hang out, make and break friendships and generally do what teens do, each one imagining they’re different from the generation before.

This is my post for Paula’s Thursday Special, ‘Fall’. You can join in, there’s always a warm welcome!

The High Lands of Orcombe

 

Orcombe Point at Exmouth marks the beginning of the Jurassic Coast, as well as being a part of the South West Coast Path. Start by walking east along the sea front until the road ends, in front of the red cliff. Look left and climb the zigzag path to the top.


There’s a bench or two along the way.

With plenty to see.

And these information circles dotted on the bank as you climb up the hill are an excuse to stop and breathe!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

It really isn’t very long before you reach the top.Where for a while the sea is out of view.

 

We pass a field where orchids are abundant in May.

Then look seawards again.

On a clear day you can see as far as Portland, but not this time. We’ve found these instead!

Who can play hopscotch?

I did it all the way to the needle, this bit’s for Meg.

If you start walking by the lifeboat station on Marine Drive, then up the cliff to the needle, it’s less than a mile and a half. If you keep going you reach Sandy Bay, with it’s caravan park in another mile. So this walk could take less that an hour, if only there weren’t such wonderful distracting views!

This little stroll is for Jo, my first Monday walk for a long time. Happy Monday Jo ūüôā

 

Lazy Poet’s Thursday . . .

fallen blossom

All winter I longed for signs of spring

now the April of dreams is passing with haste,

leaving this world like my sister who’s late.

it would be easy to dread this month of loss

instead¬†I’ll make¬†memories¬†with¬†those I love.

I’ll eat birthday cake in a garden of sunshine

laugh, eat chocolate, drink fizz with friends.

and lie in the bluebells watching the heavens

through a canopy of oak in an iron age fort.

I’ll breathe the fragrance of blossom,

then I’ll honour and give thanks

for each¬†flower that’s spent.

 

 

A Forest walk

Ashclyst Forest is National Trust land on the Killerton estate a few miles east of Exeter. There are walks from 30 minutes, suitable for buggies, and various lengths up to about four hours.

I hadn’t been there for several years, but have many times in the past so I knew my way around. Just as well, the waymarked trails were totally confusing because paint had faded on posts and some signs pointed in more than one direction.

A wood is a wood perhaps, but we started off this way.


We’re well into spring now, everywhere is fresh and green.

I’m fairly sure these are different varieties of spurge

I’m a big fan of lichen and mosses.

Every so often there are glimpses through the hedge, under the shade of young leaves, to freshly ploughed fields.

At the lowest reaches of the woods, the distant sound of machinery could be heard, one of the culprits appeared eventually.

I’m usually driving some impossibly narrow lane when I see a tractor working, so this was a real treat for me, I even got a wave from what looked like father and young son.

There were wildflowers a plenty.

Even a baby dragon.

For those of you who like a bit of decay, last years beauty hasn’t quite faded away.

And still the views keep coming.

We’ve only walked a couple of miles, but with eyes wide open and camera ready, so it took nearly two hours.

The dogs can remember this as a mud wallow and were a bit put out, but no worries we’d brought plenty of water for them!

Now, the path is beginning to look a bit more civilised, I wonder what’s through the gate.

A fairy tale cottage, painted in regulation Killerton colour, what a lovely place to live.

Another fifteen minutes and our pootling walk was over. There are no facilities in Ashclyst, but Killerton House is a ten minute¬†drive,¬†combined with the woods it’s a lovely way to spend a day.

I’m walking with Jo for the first time in ages, are you?