Tatty Sunshine

Every year I wait patiently for the first daffodils I see in full bloom, and it’s almost always on the hospital campus that I find them.

If it’s still January when they appear, I’m thrilled to bits, they’re my own little spring watch and make my heart sing. Do you have your own special sign that winter’s loosening it’s hold?

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Winter Growth

It’s taken me a while to decide what to post for last Wednesday’s photo challenge, I kept hoping I’d have an idea of something that wasn’t predictable. Now I’m fast running out of time and nothing unusual has sprung to mind, so here are my offerings.

These pictures were taken in early February a few years ago, as you know by now, in winter I’m always looking for signs of new growth and spring to arrive. Are you joining the challenge this week?

Happy January

Happy New Year!

So it’s January 1st 2018, the darkest month begins, I’m already longing for spring and today I found it, yes hooray for catkins, hazel ones I believe!

Here’s a little winter tip for you from Mrs Beeton, she suggests that,

‘At this time of year sensible females should examine their paper or muslin bags of seeds for mould, maggots and other such undesirables’

In case you’ve begun the year feeling under the weather, in 1968, The National Federation of Women’s institutes shared an Old Channel Island remedy for coughs,

Collect 20 snails from crevices in walls, half a pound moist brown sugar. Leave snails in a bowl to clean themselves. Remove and place live snails in muslin bag with the sugar. Leave to drip overnight. Bottle liquid and use a tablespoon as required.

Do you think it was meant to be swallowed or rubbed in?

 

 

The High Lands of Orcombe

 

Orcombe Point at Exmouth marks the beginning of the Jurassic Coast, as well as being a part of the South West Coast Path. Start by walking east along the sea front until the road ends, in front of the red cliff. Look left and climb the zigzag path to the top.


There’s a bench or two along the way.

With plenty to see.

And these information circles dotted on the bank as you climb up the hill are an excuse to stop and breathe!

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It really isn’t very long before you reach the top.Where for a while the sea is out of view.

 

We pass a field where orchids are abundant in May.

Then look seawards again.

On a clear day you can see as far as Portland, but not this time. We’ve found these instead!

Who can play hopscotch?

I did it all the way to the needle, this bit’s for Meg.

If you start walking by the lifeboat station on Marine Drive, then up the cliff to the needle, it’s less than a mile and a half. If you keep going you reach Sandy Bay, with it’s caravan park in another mile. So this walk could take less that an hour, if only there weren’t such wonderful distracting views!

This little stroll is for Jo, my first Monday walk for a long time. Happy Monday Jo 🙂

 

A transient cliff

West Bay in Dorset lies somewhere around half way along the Jurassic coast. The coast is a world heritage site, 95 miles long and 185 million years old.

So why am I showing you a picture of cliffs that old for a photo challenge theme of transient?

The cliffs are unstable in several places along the coast, West Bay has signs warning of rock slides just behind where people are enjoying the sun.

Quite a few years ago,  David Attenborough, the God of television nature documentaries, compared the age of our planet to the hours and minutes of a day. Apparently humankind arrived in the last minute of that day, and the planet is 4.54 billion years old. So not only are the people on this beach a mere blink of the Earth’s eye, but the crumbling cliffs are somewhat transient as well.