Six Word Saturday

Late afternoon at St catherine’s Almshouse’s

Built in the 15th century to house thirteen poor men of the city

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Seven minutes on Exeter Quay

I find my self on the Quay, not early, but too soon for the shop I need. Nine am is ahead of the masses, but the light gleams perfectly for this  i-phonographer with seven minutes to while away.

The restaurants and bars are silent, in an hour aprons will be donned, veg chopped and scones baked.

Meanwhile the swans get ready for today’s bread throwing children and thank goodness there’s not a gull screech to be heard.

Looking down river I can imagine myself somewhere more exotic, but then again, this is my Exe, perfect and pretty in it’s own way.

Piazza Terracina, named for our twin city in Italy, will be buzzing through the day, with plenty of choices,

for coffee and a sit down,

and one the old lamps for the evening.

I’ve turned towards the canal basin now, where for the summer we have pop up theatre, the Bike Shed Boatshed, complete with caravan, perhaps for more intimate performances.

I wonder how this boat got it’s name, I doubt it’s come from Meg’s territory.

Exeter canal runs parallel to the river for a few miles. It was built on the 1560’s and is the oldest navigable canal in the country. The canal was commercially successful until the decline of the wool trade in the early 19th century, followed by the arrival of the railways.

Happy Monday everyone, I hope you’re having a good Bank Holiday.

 

Black and White Sunday, Structure

Paula continues her Black and White Sunday this week with the theme of ‘Structure’. I took this photo a few weeks ago, when I was showing my friend some of the historic sites in Exeter. This building dating from the early 15th century, was once the Merchant’s House, but is now commonly known as the House that Moved.

There’s an excellent article here, written by the very knowledgeable local historian, David Cornforth, that explains the name. On the right hand side of the page is another link, to a short film from the BBC archives, a great piece of history that would throw today’s health and safety officers into a real panic.

Hope and Renewal

Last year my city hit the national news when fire destroyed the Royal Clarence, the oldest hotel in the country. Now, seven months later work is taking place to make it safe and to protect the salvageable elements. The long term plan is a sensitive rebuild.

Hope and Renewal is a sculpture created from some of the burnt timber from the fire.

This charred wood can be traced way back to the 15th century and is my entry for Paula’s Black and White Sunday.

On Stage Pride

Last weeks Exeter Pride wasn’t just about the procession, although that was great. It was followed by live entertainment on stage at Northernhay park, beside the city wall. Luckily it was a warm, blue sky day, perfect for lazing on the grass, chilling or catching up with friends. I was Gilly-no-mates at first, but did find some friends who felt sorry for me!

Then this years Chairman officially opened the event.

Some entertainment began

 

I wasn’t able to stay for Joss Stone’s performance, so it was brilliant to catch her sounds checks.

And I’m rather pleased with this photo, even if it won’t zoom in very well, click for a bigger view of the others.

The lovely lady herself, home grown in Devon.

Traces of the past, Exeter’s City Wall

Parts of Exeter’s city wall is nearly 2000 years old, built in Roman times and nearly 70 % of it still exists. Through the centuries it has been repaired and added to many times. This section of the wall is close to where the Southgate would have been.There is archaeological evidence that the gate would have had two towers, being the area of the city most vulnerable to attack, because of its proximity to the river.
of the city

Roman wall

The building inside the wall is the White Ensign Club, for serving and ex-service men and women. Formerly the Holy Trinity Church and built in 1820, on the site of a much earlier church, and the King’s Prison.

The City Wall trail is around a mile, a nice way to see some historic elements of the city.

Join Paula’s Traces of the past, she’s in Venice this week!