Wordless Wednesday, almost

If I had a hut like this . . .

 

 

Advertisements

Worth the wait?

After nearly ten years, the olive tree has started bearing fruit. Just a few last year, that never grew beyond the size of a currant. This year, they’ve survived the winter and are almost the size of the black olives I like. The birds have had a few pecks of them and spat them on the ground, so I guess they probably taste horrid.

I read somewhere that olives are cured for eating, I’ve no idea what with of how, but I expect they need a whole lot more heat and sun to be enjoyable. Some of you are in olive producing countries, perhaps you could tell me more?

A hedge or a fence

If you’re not sure, it maybe a fedge, rather like the one growing at RHS Rosemoor. It was born around four years ago, when around fifteen varieties and mixed colours were planted. The willow is harvested each year and the stems have been used to create the fedge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

The fedge will be clipped as it grows,  to maintain the geometric design.

The colours are planted in groups.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

See how the fedge blends with the background, creating strong vertical lines?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI was at Rosemoor for the sculpture in the garden, my first visit for several years. Each winter they have the sculpture exhibition, it blends beautifully with naked trees, the curves of the valley, hard landscaping and excellent design like the fedge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd of course there is the hobbit house!

 

 

Late Autumn Leaves

Last year I went to Stourhead at the end of October, to see the glorious autumn colour. Circumstances this autumn meant that I didn’t get there until yesterday, by which time a lot of the leaves had fallen. There was still plenty to see and it was a perfect day for another ‘getting back my fitness’ stroll. Rather than repeat last years post, I’m joining Jude’s Garden Challenge with a few leaves, because she wants to see anything found in a woodland environment.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.


Jude’s post is about the New Forest in Hampshire, pop over and see, maybe join in!

Garden Photography, a Favourite

Although I appreciate the amount of work that goes into making a garden neat and pristine, with everything ordered, it really doesn’t suit me at all. You knew that didn’t you?

You know I bend rules as well, but Jude won’t mind, she said she’d like this place.

So here we are back at Hill House, where you can find all kinds of rustic treasure.

hhs1hhs6

Add a touch of creativity, wouldn’t these make interesting features?

Or you could look inside the glasshouse,

hhs2You never know what you’ll find there.

hhs3Lots to inspire.

Even flowers!

So who knows what this is?

hhs9Besides being a rather unique framework for climbing plants.

hhs12We’ll pop back outside and say hi to this little lady, now the shower’s cleared.

hhs11Soak away the gardener’s aches and pains?

hhs10Perhaps a sit down on this rather splendid old bench, does it need a coat of paint or is it fine just as it is?

hhs8This small glasshouse has become rather overgrown since I last saw it, next time I might not be able to squeeze in at all.

So do you know what the climbing plant frame was originally?

Okay, it’s a wine bottle drier 🙂 and like all these items, it’s for sale.

Jude’s Garden Challenge theme this month is ‘Favourite Gardens’, may be you’d like to join in.

 

Does this look like . . .

your kind of garden?

hh2Hill House is a small, independent nursery at Landscove, Devon. Driving the last three miles to get there isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, it’s a single track lane with pull-ins in case you’re unlucky and meet a tractor. if you’re the passenger and don’t have to concentrate on the road, the views are spectacular. The road from the Devon Expressway takes you up Love Lane, Whistley Hill, Chuley Hill and Cabbage Hill!

hh3Hill House is really worth the drive, it’s the prettiest place, with unusual plants, very friendly people and the best cakes, all made on the premises.  hh4They don’t mind you wandering around the garden,

hh1On a sunny day it’s a peaceful spot for lunch, cream tea (cream first, then jam of course) or some of that cake. hh5The borders are densely planted, if you fall for something, you may find it in the nursery. hh6There are narrow paths that open up to little surprises.

hh7One of the paths leads to St Michael’s church.

hh8Which has a Victorian broached spire and is very pretty inside

hh9and has a Grade 11 listed, slate -roofed, buttressed lychgate.

hh10Back to the garden,

hh11For a last look down another path.

I’ll show you the nursery soon, I think you’ll love all the reclaimed items it has.

 

This is a scheduled post, be back soon.