Garden Photography, a Favourite

Although I appreciate the amount of work that goes into making a garden neat and pristine, with everything ordered, it really doesn’t suit me at all. You knew that didn’t you?

You know I bend rules as well, but Jude won’t mind, she said she’d¬†like this place.

So here we are back at Hill House, where you can find all kinds of rustic treasure.


Add a touch of creativity, wouldn’t these make interesting features?

Or you could look inside the glasshouse,

hhs2You never know what you’ll find there.

hhs3Lots to inspire.

Even flowers!

So who knows what this is?

hhs9Besides being a rather unique framework for climbing plants.

hhs12We’ll pop back outside and say hi to this little lady, now the shower’s cleared.

hhs11Soak away the gardener’s aches and pains?

hhs10Perhaps a sit down on this rather splendid old bench, does it need a coat of paint or is it fine just as it is?

hhs8This small glasshouse has become rather overgrown since I last saw it, next time I might not be able to squeeze in at all.

So do you know what the climbing plant frame was originally?

Okay, it’s a wine bottle drierūüôā and like all these items, it’s for sale.

Jude’s Garden Challenge theme this month is ‘Favourite Gardens’, may be you’d like to join in.


Does this look like . . .

your kind of garden?

hh2Hill House is a small, independent nursery at Landscove, Devon. Driving the last three miles to get there isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, it’s¬†a single track lane with pull-ins in case you’re unlucky and meet a tractor. if you’re the passenger and don’t have to concentrate on the road, the views are spectacular. The road from the Devon Expressway takes you up Love Lane, Whistley Hill, Chuley Hill and Cabbage Hill!

hh3Hill House is really worth the drive, it’s the prettiest place, with unusual plants, very friendly people and the best cakes, all made on the premises.¬†¬†hh4They don’t mind you wandering around the garden,

hh1On a sunny day it’s a peaceful spot for lunch, cream tea (cream first, then jam of course) or some of that cake.¬†hh5The borders are densely planted, if you fall for something, you may find it in the nursery.¬†hh6There are narrow paths that open up to little surprises.

hh7One of the paths leads to St Michael’s church.

hh8Which has a Victorian broached spire and is very pretty inside

hh9and has a Grade 11 listed, slate -roofed, buttressed lychgate.

hh10Back to the garden,

hh11For a last look down another path.

I’ll show you the nursery soon, I think you’ll love all the reclaimed items it has.


This is a scheduled post, be back soon.

Buckfast Abbey


I regularly drive past the sign for Buckfast Abbey, a place I hadn’t visited since I was a child fifty years ago. A return visit was long overdue.

abb1Benedictine monks first arrived there in the early 11th century, but the monastery was destroyed in 1539, during¬†Henry V111th’s dissolution. In 1882 a group of French Benedictine monks settled there and a slow rebuild began.

This is what happened next.

abb10What an achievement.

abb2Impressive doors.

Once inside, initially I was distinctly underwhelmed, until I stopped comparing it to the Cathedral in Exeter. abb9The vaulting is different but interesting.

A beautiful screen.

And some pretty chapels.

Buckfast is a peaceful place, the part that filled me with joy was an amazing stained glass area, where photography was not allowed. I’d go back just to see that again. I did manage to buy a postcard of part of it, glass

But you will get a better idea here.

Now, once I went outside to the gardens, I really started to enjoy Buckfast. There’s a lavender garden, but it was past it’s best, as well as a sensory and a physic garden.

So this is Buckfast, a¬†tranquil place to spend and hour or two. They have a restaurant¬†and gift shop, as well as a conference centre. Visiting, and parking is free, so if you’re driving along the Devon Expressway why not call in?

I’m tempted to link to Jo’s Monday walk, because I didn’t sit down for a couple of hours even if i didn’t walk very far, and I don’t think she’ll tell me off!


Wildside, the Bit in the Middle

Last week I posted about a quick visit to Buckland Abbey and hinted that I went somewhere else, between munch stops there. As well as Buckland, just two miles away is the beautiful Garden House, a long time favourite of mine. It was created by Keith Wiley, and considered one of the most innovative gardens in Britain. Keith left the Garden House behind twelve years ago, but he didn’t go very far, Wildside, along with Buckland and the Garden House form a trio of must see gardens, within three miles.

With his wife, artist Ros Wiley, Keith has taken a few acres of field and transformed it into a paradise filled with plants from close to home and around the world. The garden has a naturalistic style, and aims to allow plants to thrive as they would in the wild. They began by developing the lower garden.

It looks so mature, you’d never believe it’s only been twelve years.

The upper garden and the transitional areas are still being worked on, but of course a garden is never finished anyway.

I’m afraid it was a rainy day, I was holding my camera and an umbrella and both wobbled around, so my photos don’t do the garden justice. I’ll just have to go back again!

The garden is only open a few days each year, and they have a few plants for sale. My eyes feasted on a little Molly the Witch peony, I brought it home and hope I can keep it alive. Keith and Ros were there and happy to chat,¬†I asked how many people they have helping them. The answer, none, they’ve done it all on their own, a remarkable feat.

I’d highly recommend a visit if you’re in the area at the right time, and¬†I intend to watch¬†the future¬†developments¬†of this glorious floral canvas.

The Beginning and End of a Garden Day

Last Sunday my friend picked me up to take me for a birthday trip. It was a very grey day, and the direction we took meant that the¬†forecast rain was inevitable.¬†It was quite odd to be in the passenger seat, Sue isn’t an enthusiastic driver so I’m usually behind the wheel even in her car. This is the road across Dartmoor.

Dartmoor roadIt doesn’t look promising does it?

Our actual destination doesn’t have any caf√© facilities, and it was already 11.45 so we stopped off at Buckland, for coffee and halfsies on a piece of Bakewell tart.

beamsThe restaurant at Buckland has the most interesting old beams.

bucklandNational trust plant centres are always tempting but I knew there would be more interesting choices later on.

Now just play nicely together for a little while, because I’m not taking you where¬†I went just yet, there are too many photos and¬†I have to¬†try to choose some okay ones from the endless blurred rainy day ones.

Three hours have passed and we’re back at Buckland, too late for a hot lunch or sandwich, but starving, thank goodness for a cheese and onion pasty! Then it’s outside for a stroll. It’s still grey but here are some cheerful stars.

dah1and a pretty garden wall and fence.

over the fence

with a very formal Elizabethan garden.

gardenThe last time I¬†visited Buckland Abbey it was April and there wasn’t much to see in the garden at all. This time¬†I mainly saw purple, pink and magenta.

Even around the corner in the border to the side of the Abbey.


Thank you Buckland for providing the contrast in the middle of my day!