A winter visit to ROSEMOOR

It’s been a few years since I last went to the winter sculpture trail at RHS Rosemoor, so I jumped at it when my friend sue suggested it. It was a bit of a bleak day weather wise, grey and overcast and with cold showers that quickly sent us in for coffee and mocha cake. Flashes of bright winter sun and rainbows kept us smiling, as did the sculpture.

Sue and I share some favourites on show, the snail makes us both smile, but the fish that she’s keen on isn’t for me. I’ve admired the work of the creator of the three ladies below for a long time, if I could afford it and had space I’d buy them!

This striking piece above stands just before you enter the main garden, I think the RHS have commissioned it for Rosemoor.

But it might be this one, we were struggling with sideways rain at that point!

On through the garden, there were pieces that would fit anywhere,

We headed to the lake, a tranquil place in all seasons.

Then a sideways diversion to the veggie garden, to shelter from a shower again.


Via this little path, isn’t the light gorgeous?

and then this graceful creature watched quietly as we strolled to Lady Anne’s house.

We had a little walk in Lady A’s garden, but it was gone 3pm and hadn’t eaten a thing since sharing the cake at 11.30, but this is one of the pretty paths she created.

Of course, we’d missed lunch, but instead we shared a savoury afternoon tea of cheese scone with local chutney and posh crisps.

In case you’re wondering, my favourite sculpture this year are the beautitul pine cones!

For the first time in ages, I’m sharing this stroll with lovely Jo for her Monday Walks.

Have a good week.

Worth the wait?

After nearly ten years, the olive tree has started bearing fruit. Just a few last year, that never grew beyond the size of a currant.Ā This year, they’ve survived the winter and are almost the size of the black olives I like. The birds have had a few pecks of them and spat them on the ground, so I guess they probably taste horrid.

I read somewhere that olives are cured for eating, I’ve no idea what with of how, but I expect they need a whole lot more heat and sun to be enjoyable. Some of you are in olive producing countries, perhaps you could tell me more?

A hedge or a fence

If you’re not sure, it maybe a fedge, rather like the one growing at RHS Rosemoor. It was born around four years ago, when around fifteen varieties and mixed colours were planted. The willow is harvested each year and the stems have been used to create the fedge.

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The fedge will be clipped as it grows, Ā to maintain the geometric design.

The colours are planted in groups.OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

See how the fedge blends with the background, creating strong vertical lines?

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAI was at Rosemoor for theĀ sculpture in the garden, my first visit for several years. Each winter they have the sculpture exhibition, it blends beautifully with naked trees, the curves of the valley, hard landscapingĀ and excellent designĀ like the fedge.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAAnd of course there is the hobbit house!