Worth the wait?

After nearly ten years, the olive tree has started bearing fruit. Just a few last year, that never grew beyond the size of a currant. This year, they’ve survived the winter and are almost the size of the black olives I like. The birds have had a few pecks of them and spat them on the ground, so I guess they probably taste horrid.

I read somewhere that olives are cured for eating, I’ve no idea what with of how, but I expect they need a whole lot more heat and sun to be enjoyable. Some of you are in olive producing countries, perhaps you could tell me more?

A Victorian Post

My friend in Cornwall has a passion for post boxes, and I told her where to find a Victorian one, the oldest there are. Since then I’ve found several more very old ones, but never is pretty surroundings. This one is fifty yards from home and even though I’ve used it for years, I only recently realised it’s Victorian. I wonder how many other people have noticed.

It’s a shame that the Royal Mail doesn’t give it a nice new coat of paint, but if they painted all the boxes in the country they’d probably raise the cost of a stamp! Jude has a lovely collection in case you haven’t seen them . . .

Wild dream ponies

I’ve always loved this out of focus photo of Dartmoor ponies and I’ve posted it here before in black and white, but that was years ago.

img_3531aWhen I went hunting for it for Paula’s Thursday challenge, I found two more taken a few days earlier, it was a good year for ponies at Scorhill.

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All I remember about those days was wind and my cagoule blowing around, it’s rather exposed up there and I used a long exposure!

Resilient enough?

Ben at the Daily Post says,

Let’s close the year by celebrating people, places, and objects that endure.

Well I’m so late with my weekly photo challenge entry that I’m beginning the year rather than ending it. I nearly didn’t bother this week, but then something triggered a memory. A few years ago, my oldest G-baby was really interested in fossils, so I took her to see some, but it was an epic fail. We walked along the stretch of beach where I thought I’d taken these photos a few years before and I couldn’t find them! Poor Louisa was so disappointed, we had to go to the fossil shop, where I bought her a tiny ammonite. Not the same at all when I’d promised her fossils wider than she was tall.

I never did find out for certain what happened to them, at the time I said there must have been another land slide that covered them, they were frequent. But it’s possible that I just couldn’t find them. I need to go back and try again – on my own!

This is my ‘resilient’ entry, I expect you ‘ve already done yours.

This is also a reply to Liz who asked if I’d ever found any fossils. She has a stunning wildlife blog, full of photos of the flora and fauna, in the area around Capetown.

A South West Coast Path walk

Tintagel in north Cornwall is a little village with a big story, it has long been associated with King Arthur. One of the first buildings you come across as you walk down the main street, is the Old Post Office. Dating from the 14th century,this grade 1 listed former manor house became a post office in the 19th century. It’s now looked after by the National trust. I was trying to avoid people, so it’s hard to see the wavy shape of the roof.
The village is one of the most visited places in Cornwall and hence has many touristy souvenir shops.

A late start and an attempt at stopping in Boscastle, unsuccessful because of a lack of parking places, had led to empty tummies, but we managed to resist the lure of fudge! Instead we found the King Arthur’s Arms,


and had a tasty pub lunch. It was wonderful to be able to sit outside, in full sun even though it was October. All fuelled up we walked down the village, perhaps a hundred yards in the direction of the sea, and took a left turning from the road.This is the lane that leads to the coast path and the castle.

We passed this beautiful example of a Cornish dry stone wall.

This old gate post shouted out ‘please photograph me’, knowing I’m not the only one who would like it, I thought it was my duty.

The track continued down towards the sea, but we took the footpath leading to the cliffs. It’s too late for the Thrift this year, the pink flowers will be back next spring, meanwhile the lichens and mosses cling on.

Looking down from the footpath, our first glimpse of the turquoise sea. It could be a Mediterranean island.

And above, a different shade of blue, and what a fantastic view the pilot of this plane had!

I’m happy to settle for this view, of the amazing craggy rock stacks.

Across in the distance was the way to the castle, an English Heritage site. If we were earlier we might have had time to justify the entry cost of £8 each, but for an afternoon stroll we preferred the peace of the hill.

So up we went, and then he came down, crazy guy, I wouldn’t have had a hope of staying on a bike on that track.

Through the narrow gap at the top of the path, the view opens up of the footbridge leading to the castle.

I don’t think that footbridge would be everyone’s up of tea, do you?

We’ve made it up the hill though, and so have they, how clever bringing their own seats.

A few well places benches up here would be wonderful.

Never mind we’ll walk on. It isn’t very far along the top and should you prefer driving there’s a car park at Glebe cliff, that I think is National Trust. From there you could walk east towards the castle, and enjoy the views while avoiding any climbs.

It’s a great place for dog walking, Dido and Daisy were happy.

We left the sea behind to look in the church, and there were more stone walls.

Another old gate post
And then a lane leading back to the village.A last look at the Old Post Office – for now!

I’m sharing this walk with Jo, visit her Monday Walks to see where her other friends have been this week. Mine is a mere two miles, but worth it if you’re in the area and you can always walk the whole of 630 miles of the South West Coast Path while you’re here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Magic or myth?

The village of Tintagel in Cornwall has long been associated with myth and magic. This is after all where the legend of King Arthur and the knights of the round table originates. One legends says that the infant Arthur was thrown onto the beach at Tintagel and rescued by Merlin, beside whose cave Arthur landed.

Perhaps in a village where, if you keep your eyes open, Merlin may still be seen, a sword really could be pulled from a stone by magic, but only by a rightful king.