A Medieval Fayre and a Good Yarn

As many of you know, I’m a crafter and get to attend all sorts of fairs and events around Devon, One of my favourites takes place on the Saturday closest to Michaelmas, every September.

It’s Colyford Goose Fayre of course, and several thousand people visit, many dressed in Medieval costume. There’s an opening parade through the village, where everyone follows the mayor into Springfields.

ladies

Morris Dance is a must.

morrisStalls of all kinds with treats to buy.

I really wanted a besom, and not to sweep up with.

There are things to entertain the whole family, quintain, greasy pole, apple pressing, thatching displays and archery.

All kinds of foods are on offer, I can’t imagine how they got the pizza oven in place. As always the ram roast was a great success, but not for me. I planned to have some pancakes but left it too late and they were sold out, so I sulked and tried a chocolate brownie which was way too sugary and not chocolatey enough for my discerning palate, hey ho, such is life.

The stars of the fayre for me by far were these two guys.

storytellersThey have mischief written all over their faces!

This guy and his bouzouki accompany the storyteller.

And this is Dave, from Rattlebox. I only got to listen to one of his stories, the Boggart, but it was wonderfully told and I was hooked from the beginning. Hooray for Colyford Goose Fayre, it was a lovely day out!

 

 

I popped along to see Queenie’s House

 

A few weeks ago, I had half an hour to kill in London, so I walked from Victoria, up Buckingham Palace Road, wondering if Her Majesty had time for a cup of tea. Strangely, she had more pressing matters to attend to, so I just looked at her garden fence, click these for a bigger view,

her garden lighting,
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and the statue across the road.
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Oh well, I suppose I would have only had about ten minutes free to chat, but maybe next time.

Weekly Photo Challenge, Opposites

Hey WordPress guys, could you come up with an easy prompt once in a while please? Only joking,  know it’s a challenge.

Opposites. Well Exmouth, my closest beach, is opposite the nature reserve across the estuary at Dawlish Warren. Here is the nature reserve at low tide, in winter when its a rest stop for migrating birds, as well as a permanent home to a variety of birds.

warren2Now, the depth of field makes this look different from the reality. The grassy sand dunes are on the south west of the Exe, while the yellow apartment blocks are on the north east, with a mile of water in between.

warren1Does this second photo help or hinder? I promise you that nature and manmade are definitely opposites here!

Pimm's o'Clock
Pimm’s o’clock

Looking down from the balcony of my favourite Pimm’s hostelry, the sand spit on the opposite side of the estuary is Dawlish Warren nature reserve.

 

Lanhydrock, a National Trust Stroll

Last Sunday afternoon I paid a flying visit to Lanhydrock, a National Trust property in Cornwall. Arriving just before 2.30 there wasn’t much time to linger, and after the bluebells, the grounds beckoned.
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Down the long drive we go.
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Here’s the gatehouse.
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First look at the formal gardens, with the chapel in the background.
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Part of the gatehouse door.
It’s raining so I’m going inside the house and I may take you one day, but for now you can see the view through some of the windows.

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After exploring the vast house full of treasures great and small, I resisted the gift shop. Luckily my friend didn’t, so there was fudge to share🙂 and this door led to the courtyard.
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Where an equally handsome door was firmly closed.
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We head around the corner, where a very pristine garden waits.

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Which isn’t really my cup of tea, I prefer a far less structured, wild look, but I can still admire one occasionally. The rain is annoying now, the mizzely kind that while not heavy, get’s you very damp. We walk back through the gatehouse,

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wishing for more time to explore the windy paths.

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And back up the long drive to where we began, passing the bluebells growing on top of the banks, with late primroses at the bottom.

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I’m sharing my Lanhydrock visit with Jo. She’s been travelling Europe for weeks, but I think she’s still walking for Mondays,

The Daily Post, Landscape

For this week’s challenge, share a photo of a landscape: a wide establishing shot of a scene in nature or an urban setting. A simple theme you would think, but I don’t really do landscapes, I never feel that my lens is up to it. My entry is actually a phone shot, so doesn’t bear zooming in, but it’s quite pleasing nevertheless.

avon b and wYou can join in here, and see lots of really wonderful shots.

Perhaps mine is better in colour?

avon

7-Day Nature Photo, day two

My lovely blogging friend Amy has challenged me to join the 7-Day Nature Photo Challenge, begun by Ulli, and it’s right up my street.
The two branches of the river Teign rise on Dartmoor and meet at Chagford, flowing southeast to Teignmouth where it joins the English Channel. It’s a very pretty river, and at castle Drogo it runs through a steep valley. I took this photo down in that valley, half way from Drogo to Fingle Bridge, a beautiful spot.

fingle bridge

A well as posting nature photo each day for a week, I have to challenge a friend to join in. Today I’m choosing Meg, who’s spending a year in Warsaw, and enjoying a northern hemisphere spring. She has a very good eye and I loved her calligraphy branches today. No worries if you ‘re too busy Meg!