Windows on the Boat Float

Dartmouth has an inner harbour, known locally as the Boat Float. It’s a listed building, dating from around 1600, as enclosed moorings. There are many windows, each interesting in their own way, that offer stunning views over the Boat Float and the river Dart.

Michelle at the Daily Post shares a photo of a harbour through a window in Brindisi, have a look and maybe share one of your own.

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The High Lands of Orcombe

 

Orcombe Point at Exmouth marks the beginning of the Jurassic Coast, as well as being a part of the South West Coast Path. Start by walking east along the sea front until the road ends, in front of the red cliff. Look left and climb the zigzag path to the top.


There’s a bench or two along the way.

With plenty to see.

And these information circles dotted on the bank as you climb up the hill are an excuse to stop and breathe!

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It really isn’t very long before you reach the top.Where for a while the sea is out of view.

 

We pass a field where orchids are abundant in May.

Then look seawards again.

On a clear day you can see as far as Portland, but not this time. We’ve found these instead!

Who can play hopscotch?

I did it all the way to the needle, this bit’s for Meg.

If you start walking by the lifeboat station on Marine Drive, then up the cliff to the needle, it’s less than a mile and a half. If you keep going you reach Sandy Bay, with it’s caravan park in another mile. So this walk could take less that an hour, if only there weren’t such wonderful distracting views!

This little stroll is for Jo, my first Monday walk for a long time. Happy Monday Jo ūüôā

 

The Butterwalk

A row of former merchants houses and grade 1 listed buildings, the Butterwalk in Dartmouth has been standing since the early 17th century.

The structure features 11 eleven granite piers, originally 13. I’d guess the granite came from Dartmoor. There was some serious bomb damage in 1943, thankfully renovated a few years later.

It’s been ages since I’ve posted for the Weekly Photo Challenge!

Traces of the past

Over to the west of Dartmoor¬†a thatched cottage is growing out of the earth, or perhaps it’s sliding into the earth. Built in the 17th century this curved house has a passage through the middle, which might have been a division between house and livestock originally. It was the old post office for a period, and although it looks abandoned, there are also signs of work being done and the thatch seems to be in good condition. I hope it’s restored to it’s former glory, that would cost an awful lot of money.

Paula’s Thursday Special this week is traces of the past.

Don’t jump from the bridge

Clifton Suspension Bridge was designed by the great Isambard Kingdom Brunel. It was his favourite project, but he died before it was finished in 1864.

 

If ever you’re in the area, for ¬£1 toll fee you can drive over, but walk instead for free and enjoy the view of the Avon gorge.

1885, 22 year old Sarah Henley jumped off the bridge, but her dress billowed around her and acted like a parachute, gliding her to a safe landing. She lived into her mid eighties.

Between 1974 and 1993, 127 people committed suicide there. Barriers are now installed, but still around four people die each year, how terribly sad.

This is my entry for the weekly photo challenge of bridge.

The Strangest Pub I didn’t go in

First of all, I’ll confess that the title of the post was going to be the weirdest no the wierdest pub but I couldn’t make my mind up how to spell it. Do you ever get letter blind and unable to spell a word that you’ve written a million times? Please don’t all say no, you’re losing it G ūüôā

Anyway, back to the strange pub. It’s called the Highwayman and it’s on Dartmoor. Here he is holding up a coach!

and a gallery, click for a bigger view.

Here’s the man himself, unless you want to risk highway robbery,get off the moor before night falls.

What a weird place, I’ve heard it’s even stranger inside. They have rooms if you want to stay, but of course it’s haunted.

A Forest walk

Ashclyst Forest is National Trust land on the Killerton estate a few miles east of Exeter. There are walks from 30 minutes, suitable for buggies, and various lengths up to about four hours.

I hadn’t been there for several years, but have many times in the past so I knew my way around. Just as well, the waymarked trails were totally confusing because paint had faded on posts and some signs pointed in more than one direction.

A wood is a wood perhaps, but we started off this way.


We’re well into spring now, everywhere is fresh and green.

I’m fairly sure these are different varieties of spurge

I’m a big fan of lichen and mosses.

Every so often there are glimpses through the hedge, under the shade of young leaves, to freshly ploughed fields.

At the lowest reaches of the woods, the distant sound of machinery could be heard, one of the culprits appeared eventually.

I’m usually driving some impossibly narrow lane when I see a tractor working, so this was a real treat for me, I even got a wave from what looked like father and young son.

There were wildflowers a plenty.

Even a baby dragon.

For those of you who like a bit of decay, last years beauty hasn’t quite faded away.

And still the views keep coming.

We’ve only walked a couple of miles, but with eyes wide open and camera ready, so it took nearly two hours.

The dogs can remember this as a mud wallow and were a bit put out, but no worries we’d brought plenty of water for them!

Now, the path is beginning to look a bit more civilised, I wonder what’s through the gate.

A fairy tale cottage, painted in regulation Killerton colour, what a lovely place to live.

Another fifteen minutes and our pootling walk was over. There are no facilities in Ashclyst, but Killerton House is a ten minute¬†drive,¬†combined with the woods it’s a lovely way to spend a day.

I’m walking with Jo for the first time in ages, are you?

 

 

 

Black and White Sunday

The them for Paula’s black and white Sunday this week is ‘through’. The possibilities are endless aren’t they? I love taking photos through garden gates and out of windows, but the view also has to work in monochrome. Hence, I’ve chosen a building, not any old building but Chichester cathedral.

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So there we are, a view through the cloisters, up through the vaults, through a pretty gate and through from outside to in.

Worth the wait?

After nearly ten years, the olive tree has started bearing fruit. Just a few last year, that never grew beyond the size of a currant.¬†This year, they’ve survived the winter and are almost the size of the black olives I like. The birds have had a few pecks of them and spat them on the ground, so I guess they probably taste horrid.

I read somewhere that olives are cured for eating, I’ve no idea what with of how, but I expect they need a whole lot more heat and sun to be enjoyable. Some of you are in olive producing countries, perhaps you could tell me more?