The Broadchurch Beach

Broadchurch is a British crime drama series filmed in various locations in the south west of England. It has won several BAFTA’s and there has been an American remake, under the name of Gracepoint and also starring David Tennant of Dr Who fame.

It was first shown in the UK three years ago, and I’ve yet to see an episode, but I have been to the beach, it’s just down the road from Bridport, at West Bay!

bc3-02Looking west at West Bay, uh, the Broadchurch bay


bc1-1-01On a rough February day.

bc2-02 [446523]Looking east.

bc10-02Blowing away the cobwebs and getting icy cold hands!

Have you seen Broadchurch, if so should I try to catch it even though I don’t watch crime drama?

On the Cob


“It is only when our characters and events begin to disobey us that they begin to live.” John Fowles.

It was a cold, grey, October morning in Lyme Regis harbour,


but the dogs and I strolled along anyway.


They weren’t too sure about these wobbly steps


but we enjoyed the hazy view from the top


This is the famous Cob at Lyme Regis, as seen in the movie The French Lieutenant’s Woman,  from the book by John Fowles. I’ve been up there in much worse weather and it isn’t for the faint hearted, I definitely wouldn’t want a long heavy cloak swirling around my ankles in the wind as Meryl Streep did!

Jackie at A Cooking Pot and Twisted Tales invited me to join in a share of three favourite quotes. This is one of the ones I had over my desk, to inspire me, when I was studying creative writing.

I’m not going to ask anyone to take part, just anyone who wants to!


A Long Awaited Treat

From way back in the 1970’s I’ve wanted to walk down Gold Hill, in Shaftesbury, Dorset. Gold Hill became famous as a result of a much loved tv advert, created by Ridley Scott, for Hovis bread. It has a wonderful soundtrack, Dvorak’s New World symphony.

So here is my treat photo, fulfilling a long held dream.

Gold Hill October 30th towards Blackmore Vale
Gold Hill towards Blackmore Vale


I should add that Shaftesbury is only around 60 miles from home, but I think many of us neglect the gems to be seen locally don’t we?

Of course if I’d gone years ago that hill wouldn’t have been so steep, what goes down must go up and this is the view from near the bottom.

Golds hill ascent

It was a real treat humming this tune!

This post is for the Weekly Photo Challenge of ‘Treat’

A Lyme Bay Jurassic View

Jude’s  challenge this month is a bench with a view, naturally that’s impossible to resist. As far as I’m concerned, anywhere where there is a view of Lyme Bay is a winner and as it stretches for miles of Devon and Dorset there are loads of choices. This was taken on the south west coast path at Seatown , Dorset, where the Jurassic cliffs may reward you with a fossil or two if you’re patient and lucky.

Visit Jude here to join in.

Finding Sladers Yard

After a walk at Hive beach we arrived at West Bay around four o’clock on a winter afternoon, and drove around hoping for tea and cake.  We parked and dashed to a café we’d spotted, just as they turned the sign to closed. I asked the staff member if there was another café nearby and she grunted that we could try across the road. Thank goodness they were closing, because ‘across the road’ was perfect.

She had directed us to Sladers Yard, a historic rope warehouse from the early nineteenth century, that supplied rope to the whole of the British Navy. Since 2006 it has been a café, and judging by the lemon polenta cake, the food is excellent. Here is the main café area.


There is a further multi purpose space,  and the building is used as a party and wedding venue and for poetry and musical performance. Notice the building? IMG_0456_


It is beautifully done, with a perfect balance of restoration and  rawness, and as a contemporary gallery it is a stunning backdrop for the art displayed.

Sladers is run by Petter Southall a furniture designer craftsman, and his wife Anna Powell. Petter’s work is the stuff of dreams, the kind of wood that makes you want to stroke it and inhale the fragrance.


The upstairs gallery
The upstairs gallery

Goodbye Sladers, I’ll be back in summer with enough time for lunch, outside in the yard.



Checking for the date of the building, I came across . . .  where you will find photos that are much better than mine, do have a peep.


Hive Beach Stroll

Friday was the most perfect winter day here and I had an extra day off, so it couldn’t be wasted! My friend and I set off heading east with a vague idea of perhaps Lyme Regis or Charmouth. Leaving the A30 at Honiton and taking the A35, a winding, up hill and down dale road passing through little villages, Wilmington, Kilmington and Raymonds Hill. Enjoying the view, high and wide, of east Devon and west Dorset, Golden Cap, a hill and cliff which is the highest on the south coast of England, waiting for me to climb one day.

Something took on us past the Charmouth and Lyme turning, towards Burton Bradstock, ten miles further and passing through we stopped instead at Hive beach which has a National Trust car park and access to the South West Coast Path. Hive is a noisy beach, not human noise but nature’s noise, as the waves crash onto the shore and then rush back down the steeply shelved shingle.

Shingle beach
Shingle beach

There were quote a few people walking off the seasons excesses on the beach so we thought we would check out the view from the cliff path.

Looking back onto Hive beach
Looking back onto Hive beach

We climbed quite high and Lyme Bay opened up.
Lyme Bay

A gap along the path
A gap along the path

At the highest point we looked north towards Bridport.

Countryside around Bridport
Countryside around Bridport

In the distance stands Colmer Hill, somewhere else I’d like to visit.

Colmer Hill
Colmer Hill

Then we circled around common land on the side of the hill.

The flat top hill is Golden Cap
The flat top hill is Golden Cap

And retraced our steps.

Lyme bay view
Lyme bay view

We had already sampled the Hive Beach Café’s coffee, so we set off to find tea and cake, tomorrow I’ll show you where!

We only had time for a short walk because the daylight was fading fast, but the area deserves some serious hiking, there is so much to see in West Dorset.