Six Word Saturday

Last Saturday morning in the Altrarno.

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Santa Maria Novella . . .

railway station in Florence gets its name from the church just around the corner from it, and it’s where I arrived for a week in that lovely city. I took this early evening photo from my room on the fourth floor of the Rosso 23, looking at the Piazza Santa Maria Novella.

I’ll post more in the next few weeks when I’ve caught up a bit!

Celsus Ceiling

I’m joining Paula again this week, for her black and white day Sunday challenge. It has the theme of ‘Ceiling’, and I was tempted to post somewhere local, but then came across this photo taken at the library of Celsus, Ephesus, Turkey.

As it’s more than 2000 years old, perhaps it’s Paula’s oldest ceiling this week, we’ll see!

The Strangest Pub I didn’t go in

First of all, I’ll confess that the title of the post was going to be the weirdest no the wierdest pub but I couldn’t make my mind up how to spell it. Do you ever get letter blind and unable to spell a word that you’ve written a million times? Please don’t all say no, you’re losing it G ūüôā

Anyway, back to the strange pub. It’s called the Highwayman and it’s on Dartmoor. Here he is holding up a coach!

and a gallery, click for a bigger view.

Here’s the man himself, unless you want to risk highway robbery,get off the moor before night falls.

What a weird place, I’ve heard it’s even stranger inside. They have rooms if you want to stay, but of course it’s haunted.

Stop climbing over the balustrade

When I was a little girl, we didn’t have an upstairs, so any chance I could, I’d scramble around on stairs and climb over balustrades. I always wanted to climb right¬†to the top¬†and slide down the stairs. Of course I’d get told off, and off course I told my children not to do it as well!

Did you ever climb over balustrades?

These three are all in Tavira, have a lovely time Jo!

I was over the moon, when I saw Paula’s Thursday Special.

Sungai Kinabatangan

The word delta has always conjured up images in my mind of powerful rivers flowing into the sea. The Nile, the Niger and the Mississippi, exciting places that make me think of the great explorers of days gone by.

Erica at the Daily Post throws wide the definition of delta, she says,

This week, share a photograph that signifies transitions and change to you. It can be the very beginning of a phase, or the very end. As you pick up your lens, explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.

so I’ve taken advantage a little with my photo.

The Kinabatangan in Borneo rolls into the sea near Sandakan, Sabah. I was there in 2009, taking this photo five minutes before landing.

I love how the river swirls, curves, and seems to turn back on itself, an unstoppable force heading for the Sula sea.

 

Views of Dartmouth

One of this year’s birthday trips was a day at Dartmouth. We began with a hot chocolate and cinnamon toast¬†at Alf’resco, then meandered gently along the narrow streets.

stopping to see the Lower Ferry,

and enjoy the view to Kingswear, via a very pretty garden, then on along the waterfront.

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The next stop is at Bayard’s Cove Fort, a single storey artillery fort built in the 1530’s as an extra defence against any invaders making it past the castle.

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The path climbs a little now, but that means nice views.

over on the bend

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Around the creek we continue towards the castle, which I think I showed you a few weeks ago.

I’ve never been inside, but I did get told off for peeping around the door in the picture below, it’s English Heritage and a man thought I was trying to sneak in without paying.
But we were hot and in need of ice cream, not dungeons! No photos I’m afraid, but mine was toffee fudge. We retraced our steps to summon the little ferry, turning the board around so that the ferryman could see he had passengers from the other side of the river.I rarely go on a boat, so it’s always a delight to see the view from one.

Lot’s of interesting and very expensive properties on both sides.

and there’s Bayard’s Cove Fort again.

Nearly back to town. Just ten minutes or so on the water, and it feels like a different world.

They’re still crabbing, I’d be a bit nervous if my child was sitting there. We’ve missed lunch, so we stroll towards the little harbour to see what we can find. No lunch, just a pasty and some new sunglasses for me!

It takes less than an hour to walk from the town to the castle, even taking lots of photos and view stops. Even though it’s short, I know that Jo will like it, for the boats if nothing else. She likes to walk on Mondays, or with her lovely daughter, last week they went to Rufford Abbey near Nottingham

 

Weekly Photo Challenge, Order

Ben Huberman calls for order in this weeks photo challenge, and he has a tempting array of pastries in his well ordered photo.

The image below is one of my all time favourites and¬†I may¬†have posted it here before.¬†This vast courtyard is¬†part of¬†the Ataturk Mausoleum complex¬†in Ankara, the capital of Turkey. As well as the mausoleum which is the final resting place of Kemal Ataturk, the founder of modern Turkey’s final resting place, there is a museum dedicated to his life.