Santa Eulalia’s Geese

The day we arrived in Barcelona we were shattered, but determined to hit the streets after a bit of a snooze. Wanting to get out of the Ramblas as soon as possible, seeing a sign for the cathedral seemed a good idea. The Catedral de la Santa Creu i Santa Eulàlia as it’s called in Catalan, was on the must see list.

We soon became distracted by the sights and sounds of the city, but knew we must be heading in the right direction, and once cooled by an ice cream we soon found it.

 But it had just closed, so we had to wait half an hour, which we spent people watching on the steps.

Eventually we were allowed in, to admire the Gothic vaults built between the 13th and 15th centuries.

bac4Remembering to look in all directions.

bac5The Cathedral, which is the seat of the bishop of Barcelona, is known for its rather unusual cloisters and I have to confess that was what particularly drew me. There’s an odd looking fountain, but in the background . . .

Yes, geese, thirteen of them, representing the age of Santa Eulalia when she was martyred in Roman times.

Despite the crowds, the cloister was an extraordinary peaceful place, and it warranted more time than our tiredness would allow. Maybe next time.

bac9In the absence of any food, I think she would have been happy to chat.

I’m leaving you with this beautiful Madonna and Child, there was something about her that touched me, I hope you can see it too.

The Palau de la Musica Catalana

Architect Domenech Montaner’s stunning concert hall in Barcelona marks the zenith of the Modernista movement in the city. He called it his ‘Garden of Music’, and it is a joy to behold. As soon as you arrive you can tell you’re in for a treat.

When you turn from the narrow street, there’s a new entrance.

With the Good Conductor waiting to take charge.

Just inside there’s a rather elegant bar. On a guided tour we learn that a church beside the Palau was pulled down and the new entrance created, with a small auditorium. Then we get the first dazzling glimpse.

 

A dynamic representation of Wagner’s Ride of the Valkyries flies high above our heads.

It’s hard to know which way to look!

But Pegasus is also in flight.

While on the balcony I have to wait to photograph a row of mosaic pillars where too many people had the same idea.

Then we go back inside on the top floor to see what we’ve really been waiting for.

Montaner’s vision was to blur the boundaries between interior and exterior, creating light that would change throughout the day.

You should be able to click on the image to get a closer view. It’s a kind of inverted dome, a stained glass orb skylight, totally entrancing. The tour finished with a short performance of Bach’s Toccata and Fugue, I can’t think of anywhere better to hear it.

This post is for Jo who’s been to the Palau and hopefully will like this little reminder, and for Jude who may like to go there sometime in the future.

I’m sorry, I’m way behind and owe many of you messages! 

I popped along to see Queenie’s House

 

A few weeks ago, I had half an hour to kill in London, so I walked from Victoria, up Buckingham Palace Road, wondering if Her Majesty had time for a cup of tea. Strangely, she had more pressing matters to attend to, so I just looked at her garden fence, click these for a bigger view,

her garden lighting,
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and the statue across the road.
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Oh well, I suppose I would have only had about ten minutes free to chat, but maybe next time.

An Elusive Mountain

Paula at Lost in Translation has given us a list of five words to chose from for her Thursday Special this week. Her words are,

elusive

viscid

brilliant

profusion

and disorder

Flying over north east Borneo to Sabah, there’s good chance you’ll see Mount Kinabalu, unless you’re very fit, you’ll find it pretty elusive otherwise. Even seven years ago I wouldn’t have been fit enough to climb it, mountain are for looking at!

kinabalu

Taken from a plane window, this is isn’t the clearest image, if it was it wouldn’t be quite as elusive would it?🙂

Paula would love to see you too, pop across and say hello.

 

Buckfast Abbey

 

I regularly drive past the sign for Buckfast Abbey, a place I hadn’t visited since I was a child fifty years ago. A return visit was long overdue.

abb1Benedictine monks first arrived there in the early 11th century, but the monastery was destroyed in 1539, during Henry V111th’s dissolution. In 1882 a group of French Benedictine monks settled there and a slow rebuild began.

This is what happened next.

abb10What an achievement.

abb2Impressive doors.

Once inside, initially I was distinctly underwhelmed, until I stopped comparing it to the Cathedral in Exeter. abb9The vaulting is different but interesting.

abb3
A beautiful screen.

And some pretty chapels.

abb6
Buckfast is a peaceful place, the part that filled me with joy was an amazing stained glass area, where photography was not allowed. I’d go back just to see that again. I did manage to buy a postcard of part of it, glass

But you will get a better idea here.

Now, once I went outside to the gardens, I really started to enjoy Buckfast. There’s a lavender garden, but it was past it’s best, as well as a sensory and a physic garden.

So this is Buckfast, a tranquil place to spend and hour or two. They have a restaurant and gift shop, as well as a conference centre. Visiting, and parking is free, so if you’re driving along the Devon Expressway why not call in?

I’m tempted to link to Jo’s Monday walk, because I didn’t sit down for a couple of hours even if i didn’t walk very far, and I don’t think she’ll tell me off!

 

Vintage Ashburton

So just now I was talking about Ashburton and it’s abundance of vintage shops, and it seemed rude not to show you.

And there were more!

Ashburton centre really only has two streets, but they are full of charm, here are some views.

So who’s a fan of vintage? if you are then you’d be in heaven in Ashburton. I’m not, it’s too twee for my taste. Having said that, I wouldn’t say no to an old typewriter or some cameras!

The Doors of Tavira

Last year, after a visit to Tavira in the Algarve, I posted about the interesting door knockers there. I always intended to post some photos of the equally interesting doors, but forgot all about it.

Any favourites? Mine is the one that say ‘6door’ when you hover over it.

Then I say Becky’s Thursday Doors post, which has beautiful doors from various places in Portugal, and a link to an earlier post with an almost identical photo to this one.
vib3
Like me she found it irresistible!
Do you have a passion for doors? I’ll always remember a silver one I saw in Rajasthan.

Morning in the Algarve

Imagine your typical morning. You might picture your favorite coffee mug. A streak of sunlight coming through your bedroom window. Or the roosters in your backyard that sound off at 5 am. Or a photo from breakfast of a pastéis de nata, a delicious Portuguese egg tart pastry, while on holiday in Lisbon?

This is Cheri’s challenge over at the Daily Post. Well, I can’t do Lisbon, but I can do pasteis de nata, in Vila Real de Santo Antonio!

por3While I was there, a peaceful morning called me to the riverside.

And here’s a blue sky Tavira morning

tav1and a low morning tide is good for harvesting shell fish in the Gilao river.

tav2You can join Cheri’s challenge here, and see lots of other entries that will inspire you.