Bridges across the Arno

At least seven bridges span the River Arno in Florence, here are some of them,

Beginning with the closest, Ponte Vecchio, the only one not bombed in WW2. Next Ponte St Trinita, Ponte alla Carraia – my favourite, and way off in the distance, the most modern, Ponte Amerigo Vespucci.

I’ve chosen this photo for Paula’s Thursday special, pick a word from five. I chose spanning and the photo was taken through a window in the Uffizi.

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Three Favourite photos

That I can’t choose between.

I get a bit snap happy when I’m in a new, exciting place, and I must say that since I’ve been taking photos, I notice the world around me so much more. I do get fed up with carrying things though, so some days if a camera feels too heavy or it won’t go in my bag of the day, I’ll move down to a smaller one. Of course the phone is the easiest option, but limited in its capabilities.

I rarely take my dslr out these days, so these three images were all captured with my biggest active camera. They’re the ones I like best from a week in Florence, with a day out in Tuscany.

Do you have lazy camera days or are you okay with carrying heavy things? Perhaps it’s a girl thing, after all we do need ALL the contents of our handbags, an umbrella if it rains and a warm layer if it gets too cool!

Enough waffle, these are the three photos.

An exhibition in Florence
View of the Tuscan hills from Fiesole
The anticipation of rain, Siena

Like or dislike any of them?

A walk in the Oltrarno

On our second full day in Florence we decided to do part of a walk in a guide book.  We weren’t following it exactly because it didn’t make sense. Okay I’ll confess, the first part was too close to our hotel, so we skipped it. In doing so, we emerged on the river bank  further east than the walk, so took a slight diversion. Where’s the fun in exploring a new city without going up some back alleys?

We emerged on Piazza Santa Maria Del Carmine, where the church of the same name had a rather dull exterior, and had a peep inside.

This church of the Carmelite order was built in 1268, but was damaged by fire in 1771 and the interior rebuilt in the Rococo style 11 years later. It was nicer inside than out.

We got our bearings back and headed for the Via Santo Spirito, occasionally getting distracted, wondering what was up there or around that corner.

One of the things we did find from the walk description, was this pretty stone tabernacle from the 14th century. The fresco of the Madonna with Child and the Saints Paolo and Gerolamo) is reputed to be the work of Bicci di Lorenzo. The little figure between the  saints is the person who the commissioned the fresco.

A sharp shower sent us rushing for an espresso and a bit of a sit down.

Then we were off again.

Towards Santa Spirito, the heart of this creative, bohemian area.

Oltrarno is the home of many artisan workshops, including the fabulous shop I showed you last week. Surprises and smiles are around every corner.

 

Close to a nursery school, we came across this moving sculpture, in honour of the Armenian genocide.

Let us not forget.

Back to the streets and we were drifting south to what we thought was a secondary entrance to Boboli gardens.

So we turned tail towards the direction of the river, passing elegant gates leading to secluded mansions.

We didn’t fetch up where we expected even then.

Instead we found the Pitti Palace and lunch in a cafe opposite. I made a mistake in that cafe, ordering something with meat. I was quite upset that I’d mixed a word up, but they kindly changed it for what I’d intended to order. That’ll teach me not to think I’m too clever!

We had a gelato and watched the world go by after lunch,

and of course I loved this sculpture.

We ended this walk, which I’m sharing with Jo, who knows it well, at Ponte Vecchio.

I wonder where she’s walking this week.

Santa Maria Novella . . .

railway station in Florence gets its name from the church just around the corner from it, and it’s where I arrived for a week in that lovely city. I took this early evening photo from my room on the fourth floor of the Rosso 23, looking at the Piazza Santa Maria Novella.

I’ll post more in the next few weeks when I’ve caught up a bit!

Celsus Ceiling

I’m joining Paula again this week, for her black and white day Sunday challenge. It has the theme of ‘Ceiling’, and I was tempted to post somewhere local, but then came across this photo taken at the library of Celsus, Ephesus, Turkey.

As it’s more than 2000 years old, perhaps it’s Paula’s oldest ceiling this week, we’ll see!

The Strangest Pub I didn’t go in

First of all, I’ll confess that the title of the post was going to be the weirdest no the wierdest pub but I couldn’t make my mind up how to spell it. Do you ever get letter blind and unable to spell a word that you’ve written a million times? Please don’t all say no, you’re losing it G 🙂

Anyway, back to the strange pub. It’s called the Highwayman and it’s on Dartmoor. Here he is holding up a coach!

and a gallery, click for a bigger view.

Here’s the man himself, unless you want to risk highway robbery,get off the moor before night falls.

What a weird place, I’ve heard it’s even stranger inside. They have rooms if you want to stay, but of course it’s haunted.

Stop climbing over the balustrade

When I was a little girl, we didn’t have an upstairs, so any chance I could, I’d scramble around on stairs and climb over balustrades. I always wanted to climb right to the top and slide down the stairs. Of course I’d get told off, and off course I told my children not to do it as well!

Did you ever climb over balustrades?

These three are all in Tavira, have a lovely time Jo!

I was over the moon, when I saw Paula’s Thursday Special.