The 19240

 

Three years ago, Rob Heard was feeling really low while recovering from an accident. Watching soldiers returning from Afghanistan on TV, led to him thinking about the loss of lives in wartime and the incredible numbers involved. He found it impossible to imagine the 19,240 men who died in just one day, July 1st 1916, at the battle of the Somme.

From a list of the names of every one of the 19240, he created a hand stitched shroud containing a 12 inch figure, crossing off names as he went. Rob didn’t have a plan when he began the project, but a friend, Steve Knightly a musician from the band Show of Hands, contacted the city council, the Royal Albert Memorial Museum and Exeter Chiefs rugby foundation. This has become the UK’s largest WW1 commemoration and has featured in the national news this week.

If you’re in the area, the 19240 Shrouds of the Somme can be seen at Northernhay Gardens, Exeter until July 7th. I’d recommend it, it’s a highly emotional commemoration to a part of history that must never be repeated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thursday Evening in the Close

Cathedral Close, Exeter after a light meal at Cote, my current favourite brasserie. We crossed towards the cathedral, just because, and had a peep at this view.

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Then turned along the green.

cl2The lovely building on the left is Mols Coffee House, dated 1596.

cl3We were heading back to the car, but I lingered long enough for some pics in the early evening light.

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Then over the cobbles and away home.

cl7With the Royal Clarence Hotel, supposedly the oldest hotel in England, in the background.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Seasons

The word “seasons” can also describe a period or phase of your life. If this context resonates with you, share an image that expresses the seasonality of life itself or the present season of your life.

This is Jen’s prompt for the weekly photo challenge over at the Daily Post. Everything I see outside my window is grey, and dank. Maybe this weekend there’ll be some sunshine. Meanwhile on Tuesday I went out for supper straight from work. Lots of you know that in summer, I often head to the coast after work for fish and chops and Pimms, I’m really looking forward for that season to begin.
This week was supper in town, in a lovely restaurant,
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What can we see through the window, maybe a closer look.
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The Cathedral looking beautiful at dusk.
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The restaurant was nice, I wondered what it was like in the Christmas season.
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After delicious food, we wandered up through Catherine Street, where the ruined chapel is lit up in the gloom.

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We walked along Egypt Lane, past this colour changing window gap.
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and a whole row of restaurants, with lots of outside seating, but it’s not the season for al fresco dining is it now?

Walking the Goat to the Bowling Green

Today I took the dogs for a favourite walk at Topsham, one of those places I never tire of, if you keep your eyes open there’s always something to see.

We started off by checking Vigilant’s progress, you may remember her?It’s a slow and expensive process but she’s looking healthier. 1420114202

We headed off down the Strand, a pretty street with the river to the right and houses of all shapes and sizes, some with a Dutch influence, to the left.

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Some have gardens across the road that lead to the river, I love having a sneaky peep.
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They can even grow Housetrees here!
The tide was right out today so the old girls and I scrambled down the steps at,
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where Daisy just couldn’t resist the mud.
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I pootled with Dido to see what we could find,


Stood on my toes to see into a garden,
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where the sculpture seemed to mirror the pudding bushes – but I couldn’t photograph them because the wall was too high. So we walked on to the end of the road,

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where the Goat Walk begins. There are benches all the way along, but the sun was hiding under the clouds so we didn’t linger today, except to listen to a young boy telling his little sister about the solar system and illustrating it in the sand.
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I think that in days gone by there must have been a big estate behind the wall, with this gate to the path so that they could go goat strolling. There are several big, old houses across the fields.
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We turn left and the end and leave the river behind for a few minutes.
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Bowling Green Marsh is a nature reserve with an abundance of wildlife, and a rest stop for thousands of migratory birds. Let’s walk up this path,

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Wildlife only on the left, but here’s the view.

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Not too bad is it? If you have sharp eyes, you can see the train. If you’re ever down this way, check the tide is low and catch the train from Exeter to Exmouth, even Michael Portillo featured it recently on his Great Railway Journeys.

We’ll pop up to the viewing platform,

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In case we lose our bearings this might help,

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This is the point where the river Clyst flows into the Exe.

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Exmouth is on the horizon. I went back to the main path and headed for the bird hide, as usual I forgot to bring binoculars, but  a kind RSPB volunteer let me use his to see some Snipe out on the mud. No photos, I only had my phone, but I doubt that my camera would have helped at this distance.

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They are there though I promise, and the chanting was wonderful.

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I’ll leave you with this last view, and walk up Bowling Green road to complete my circular walk by the railway bridge where I left my car.

I’m sharing with Jo, she’s probably feeling the chill this week!