Don’t jump from the bridge

Clifton Suspension Bridge was designed by the great Isambard Kingdom Brunel. It was his favourite project, but he died before it was finished in 1864.

 

If ever you’re in the area, for £1 toll fee you can drive over, but walk instead for free and enjoy the view of the Avon gorge.

1885, 22 year old Sarah Henley jumped off the bridge, but her dress billowed around her and acted like a parachute, gliding her to a safe landing. She lived into her mid eighties.

Between 1974 and 1993, 127 people committed suicide there. Barriers are now installed, but still around four people die each year, how terribly sad.

This is my entry for the weekly photo challenge of bridge.

Sungai Kinabatangan

The word delta has always conjured up images in my mind of powerful rivers flowing into the sea. The Nile, the Niger and the Mississippi, exciting places that make me think of the great explorers of days gone by.

Erica at the Daily Post throws wide the definition of delta, she says,

This week, share a photograph that signifies transitions and change to you. It can be the very beginning of a phase, or the very end. As you pick up your lens, explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.

so I’ve taken advantage a little with my photo.

The Kinabatangan in Borneo rolls into the sea near Sandakan, Sabah. I was there in 2009, taking this photo five minutes before landing.

I love how the river swirls, curves, and seems to turn back on itself, an unstoppable force heading for the Sula sea.

 

A transient cliff

West Bay in Dorset lies somewhere around half way along the Jurassic coast. The coast is a world heritage site, 95 miles long and 185 million years old.

So why am I showing you a picture of cliffs that old for a photo challenge theme of transient?

The cliffs are unstable in several places along the coast, West Bay has signs warning of rock slides just behind where people are enjoying the sun.

Quite a few years ago,  David Attenborough, the God of television nature documentaries, compared the age of our planet to the hours and minutes of a day. Apparently humankind arrived in the last minute of that day, and the planet is 4.54 billion years old. So not only are the people on this beach a mere blink of the Earth’s eye, but the crumbling cliffs are somewhat transient as well.

Weekly PhotoChallenge, reflecting

I was walking through town yesterday, enjoying the crowds, and the great atmosphere. It was Exeter Pride, a vibrant, colourful event with a long parade of people wearing rainbow colours, flying the flag and bursting with excitement.

Everyone was happy, or so I thought. Then I saw this lady, she was leaning on a trolley shopper thingy and heading towards the bus stop.

Reflecting

It may be that she was just wondering when the buses would start running again. Perhaps she was reflecting on the loss of youth, a samba band were passing, so everyone was jiggling about. I really hope it was nothing worse.

 

 

What is danger?

We each have our own perception of danger don’t we? I have no fear of heights, but having been bitten by a spider I find them dangerous. I’ve been in a huge bat cave in Borneo, but because it was a climb up inside,  saw no danger.

Now, put me in a dark hole in the ground, that’s my idea of danger. Being enclosed like that is scary, really grim. But I did it anyway, some fears are meant to be conquered aren’t they?

 

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But I won’t be going down a lava tube again!

 

Weekly Photo Challenge, Anticipation

This week, share a photo that says anticipationA candid shot of your niece, eager to blow out the candles on her birthday cake. A photo from the trip you’d long dreamed of. An image of something you hope to have one day, or something that was worth the wait. For those who celebrate Christmas, how about a photo of the stockings hung by the chimney with care?

Right about know, Santa is getting ready for the busiest night of his year, a bit like year end in my office. I’m sure the elves are working their socks off and Mrs Claus is planning to make the biggest packed lunch ever, she doesn’t know how many mince pies her husband eats on his journey.

One of Santa’s very important helpers, Vixen, in anticipation of next Saturday, is getting as much rest as possible, snoozing in the barn.

reindeer-copy

Michelle created this weeks challenge, see her cute cat anticipating mice for dinner.

Looking up at the Alcazar

Nancy says that,

Going about our day, we often don’t pay attention to what’s directly above us. We’re more likely to focus on what’s in front of us rather than what’s overhead.

But like some of my friends here, I look everywhere when I’m out and about, you never know what your camera will find otherwise.

If I hadn’t looked up when I went to the Alcazar in Seville last year, I would have missed loads of photo opps, like these.

And then there was naughty Neptune!

al5 Are you observant, do yo look up? if you have images to share go visit Nancy at the Daily Post.

Partners in mischief

Sabah, Christmas 2009, at the Sepilok orang-utan rehabilitation centre. I was beginning to feel pretty rough, dizzy in fact and I didn’t get better for a few days. It was annoying because we’d found somewhere to have an English Christmas dinner and I could only watch my friends enjoying it. Before that though, I’d seen a troup of orangs arrive for lunch in the centre. There were lots of long tailed macaques, cashing in on the free tuck. Very cheeky monkeys, who would sneek up behind you to see what they could find. Like the baby orangs they were cute when tiny, but here are a couple of pre-teens.

partnersI don’t know what they were up to but they were definitely partners in mischief!

Curves inside and out

Cheri at the Daily Post has chosen the theme of curves for this weeks photo challenge. I have a friend who likes straight lines in imagery, but I’ll always choose the curves and swirls we find in nature, in any design or art.

I took this first photo a few weeks ago at Coldharbour Mill, in east Devon. It was leaning against a wall at the back of a courtyard and I had to capture it.

curvesa1Next, there’s a humpy hedge behind these curvy evergreens. Apparently when it was a baby hedge, there was a very harsh winter and it was weighed down by snow. The gardeners tried to repair it, but failed and knowing they’d lost the battle, they decided to allow it to grow it’s own curvy way.

curve2

A few weeks ago I posted a black and white version of some William Morris wallpaper,

curvy

There were several comments about the original colours, so here it is, colours, curves and even a well placed ceramic plate.