Through a glass lightly . . .

. . . there’s a very handsome face in the crowd.

Agreed girls?

It’s Wednesday, so it’s time for the Weekly Photo Challenge. This weeks theme is ‘Face in the crowd’, from Erica V.

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How many . . .

. . . of these do you think I can eat?

There is no competition, Lindor Extra Dark are my very favourite chocolates. Last year in Florence, I found the Lindt shop and of course I was forced to try some flavours that I hadn’t seen before. They were lush and I wouldn’t turn any of them down, but chocolate should be dark to be taken seriously.

Now, I’ve tried all sorts of expensive chocolate with high cocoa percentages and they are lovely even when there’s barely any sugar.

But these Lindor still win.

Although they’re dark, they’re still sweet.So how many of these heavenly treats can I eat?

I think I’ll leave you guessing . . .

Being a tour guide

What do I love about where I live, is the question asked by Krista, for this week’s photo challenge of tour guide. So where would take visitors to my city, where have I actually taken them? Well it depends on their interests and there are lots of choices. Perhaps I’d start by the quay. We’d walk down from the crescent,

stoping to admire this view

splash out 20p for the ferry across the river

stand beside one of the Victorian lamp posts looking towards the pubs and cafes, as well as the transit shed. Then perhaps stroll towards the Port Royal, for a coffee or lunch.

We’ll cross the suspension bridge at Trew’s weir,

Go full circle, don’t worry it’s less than a mile.

Exeter was once a thriving port, we’ll cross back to the old custom’s house, via the little wooden  bridge. Mallisons’ bridge was paid for by a Professor Mallison, who left his money to the city. You often have to dodge the swans there, they get a bit pesky hoping for food.

We’re going to have a little jaunt to Topsham next, shall we go by train, bus or shank’s pony? Umm, the bus is quickest, we want to squeeze as much in as we can.

Here we are, on Topsham quay now, just a couple of miles down the Exe.

We seem to have done a little time travelling, just because I like the sunsets there.

Now, we have no choice but to walk, down to Bowling Green Marsh.

Becky would like it there, it’s a resting place for migratory birds, if you time it right. There are widgeons and lapwings in this photo, but it isn’t very clear. Bring some binoculars and you might see quite a collection of species, avocet are common, osprey are sometimes around.

We’ll catch the bus back to town.

Nice view in August as you pass Dart’s farm, they grow sunflowers to raise money for Hospiscare.

We haven’t been more than four miles from the centre of the city now let’s head for the heart. Jump off the bus in High Street.

Turn down Ship Lane and into Cathedral Close, where it’s strangely dark.

I love this ancient oak door it leads to the Bishop’s Palace.

And no visit to the city is complete without going into the cathedral,

so here’s my favourite Lady Chapel.

On y soit qui mal y pense etc. etc.

Hope you like my city, you’ve probably guessed how much I love it! I’m also hoping to attract a certain someone down here, no prizes!

Thursday Special, pick a word

Pick a word from five, or choose all of them if you like, says Paula at Lost in Translation for her Thursday Special. The choices are, innate, protuberant, fluorescent, rectangular and interspersed. She has five great shots, my favourite of which is fluorescent. I intended to use rectangular, but then scrolling through for ideas, I realised how interspersed these photos of Dawlish Warren are.

The brown, wintery sea at the Warren is interspersed with white foam,

The beach is interspersed with groins.

and people, and on the other coast at Exmouth the view is interspersed with houses, trees, seaside entertainment venues.

My lovely boodle

Jen asks that we share a photo or several of something that is dearly loved for the weekly photo challenge. Leaving family aside and small objects of desire, it’s not easy to pick. No surprisingly I’ve seen a few photos of pets and so I’ve decided to do the same.

If you’re an animal lover of a certain age, there’s a high chance you’ve experienced the loss of a pet at some time in your life. Last year it happened to me – twice in quick succession and while the edge of the pain has faded, whenever I come across a photo of Dido and Daisy, the tears are never far behind.

But then in July new puppies arrived. The moment my eyes met Flora’s she was mine and the moment Flora’s eyes met mine, I was hers.

She’s impossible to take photos of, dark eyes hide behind dark fur and she moves swift as light.

So, she’s my beloved Boodle (border terrier cross miniature poodle’, her brother George who belongs to my housemate, comes a very close second.

 

 

Varied Votives

One of the places I enjoyed most in Tuscany last year, was Fiesole, somewhere I knew little about until I got there. As well as the amazing Roman theatre, there’s the Civic Archaeological Museum, packed with displays and information about the Etruscan, Roman and Longobard history of the town. I was enthralled by these little votives, especially the dancing satyr, so I’m sharing these variations on the theme of Etruscan bronzes, for this weeks photo challange. I believe they were excavated in the 19th and early 20th century.

Fiesole lies five miles to the north east of Florence,high in the hills and you can catch a frequent bus close to Piazza San Marco.

Winter Growth

It’s taken me a while to decide what to post for last Wednesday’s photo challenge, I kept hoping I’d have an idea of something that wasn’t predictable. Now I’m fast running out of time and nothing unusual has sprung to mind, so here are my offerings.

These pictures were taken in early February a few years ago, as you know by now, in winter I’m always looking for signs of new growth and spring to arrive. Are you joining the challenge this week?

Ascending Houndtor

One of my favourite of the well known spots on Dartmoor is Hound Tor. The area is surrounded with legends and history, and it’s believed to have inspired Conan Doyle’s ‘Hounds of the Baskervilles’.

I’s a steady ascent from the small parking area and the view is wonderful.

If you have the energy, once you reach the top, you can drop down the other side to the ruins of a medieval village where you’ll be surrounded by ghosts from the past.

This is my entry for the weekly photo challenge of Ascend.