Wordless Wednesday

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Celsus Ceiling

I’m joining Paula again this week, for her black and white day Sunday challenge. It has the theme of ‘Ceiling’, and I was tempted to post somewhere local, but then came across this photo taken at the library of Celsus, Ephesus, Turkey.

As it’s more than 2000 years old, perhaps it’s Paula’s oldest ceiling this week, we’ll see!

The High Lands of Orcombe

 

Orcombe Point at Exmouth marks the beginning of the Jurassic Coast, as well as being a part of the South West Coast Path. Start by walking east along the sea front until the road ends, in front of the red cliff. Look left and climb the zigzag path to the top.


There’s a bench or two along the way.

With plenty to see.

And these information circles dotted on the bank as you climb up the hill are an excuse to stop and breathe!

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It really isn’t very long before you reach the top.Where for a while the sea is out of view.

 

We pass a field where orchids are abundant in May.

Then look seawards again.

On a clear day you can see as far as Portland, but not this time. We’ve found these instead!

Who can play hopscotch?

I did it all the way to the needle, this bit’s for Meg.

If you start walking by the lifeboat station on Marine Drive, then up the cliff to the needle, it’s less than a mile and a half. If you keep going you reach Sandy Bay, with it’s caravan park in another mile. So this walk could take less that an hour, if only there weren’t such wonderful distracting views!

This little stroll is for Jo, my first Monday walk for a long time. Happy Monday Jo ūüôā

 

Black and White Sunday

It’s Paula’s After Before week, she asks that we post the same image, in black and white and in colour. It’s a good way to see what works in monochrome, especially if like me, you don’t think of trying it.

Here’s my after, it’s not quite the usual reflection, the window had a stick on mirror so that the people inside could see out, but you can’t see in.

And before,

Any preference? Paula has a beautiful Corsican sea scene, take a look here.

The Strangest Pub I didn’t go in

First of all, I’ll confess that the title of the post was going to be the weirdest no the wierdest pub but I couldn’t make my mind up how to spell it. Do you ever get letter blind and unable to spell a word that you’ve written a million times? Please don’t all say no, you’re losing it G ūüôā

Anyway, back to the strange pub. It’s called the Highwayman and it’s on Dartmoor. Here he is holding up a coach!

and a gallery, click for a bigger view.

Here’s the man himself, unless you want to risk highway robbery,get off the moor before night falls.

What a weird place, I’ve heard it’s even stranger inside. They have rooms if you want to stay, but of course it’s haunted.

Stop climbing over the balustrade

When I was a little girl, we didn’t have an upstairs, so any chance I could, I’d scramble around on stairs and climb over balustrades. I always wanted to climb right¬†to the top¬†and slide down the stairs. Of course I’d get told off, and off course I told my children not to do it as well!

Did you ever climb over balustrades?

These three are all in Tavira, have a lovely time Jo!

I was over the moon, when I saw Paula’s Thursday Special.

Sungai Kinabatangan

The word delta has always conjured up images in my mind of powerful rivers flowing into the sea. The Nile, the Niger and the Mississippi, exciting places that make me think of the great explorers of days gone by.

Erica at the Daily Post throws wide the definition of delta, she says,

This week, share a photograph that signifies transitions and change to you. It can be the very beginning of a phase, or the very end. As you pick up your lens, explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.

so I’ve taken advantage a little with my photo.

The Kinabatangan in Borneo rolls into the sea near Sandakan, Sabah. I was there in 2009, taking this photo five minutes before landing.

I love how the river swirls, curves, and seems to turn back on itself, an unstoppable force heading for the Sula sea.

 

Views of Dartmouth

One of this year’s birthday trips was a day at Dartmouth. We began with a hot chocolate and cinnamon toast¬†at Alf’resco, then meandered gently along the narrow streets.

stopping to see the Lower Ferry,

and enjoy the view to Kingswear, via a very pretty garden, then on along the waterfront.

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The next stop is at Bayard’s Cove Fort, a single storey artillery fort built in the 1530’s as an extra defence against any invaders making it past the castle.

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The path climbs a little now, but that means nice views.

over on the bend

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Around the creek we continue towards the castle, which I think I showed you a few weeks ago.

I’ve never been inside, but I did get told off for peeping around the door in the picture below, it’s English Heritage and a man thought I was trying to sneak in without paying.
But we were hot and in need of ice cream, not dungeons! No photos I’m afraid, but mine was toffee fudge. We retraced our steps to summon the little ferry, turning the board around so that the ferryman could see he had passengers from the other side of the river.I rarely go on a boat, so it’s always a delight to see the view from one.

Lot’s of interesting and very expensive properties on both sides.

and there’s Bayard’s Cove Fort again.

Nearly back to town. Just ten minutes or so on the water, and it feels like a different world.

They’re still crabbing, I’d be a bit nervous if my child was sitting there. We’ve missed lunch, so we stroll towards the little harbour to see what we can find. No lunch, just a pasty and some new sunglasses for me!

It takes less than an hour to walk from the town to the castle, even taking lots of photos and view stops. Even though it’s short, I know that Jo will like it, for the boats if nothing else. She likes to walk on Mondays, or with her lovely daughter, last week they went to Rufford Abbey near Nottingham

 

Black and white Sunday, typical

Driving around Dartmoor this evening, I spotted¬†this Devon village green. It’s typical of the sort of place you find on the moor, with it’s Saxon stone cross.¬†It looks as if nothing has changed for centuries, but apparently the cross was found in a barn and moved to the green in1985. It’s early Christian and has X’s and O’s engraved on it.

This is for Paula’s black and white Sunday typical theme, she has a dreamy image of Venice this week.