A little Sunday poem

A Blackbird fell

Have you ever wondered
what happens to the birds?
sparrows entertain us town folk
rewarding us for gardens treats
the seeds and nuts we deem delicious
dangling from pretend trees

a thrush will mine a snail
from its private caravan
but no bird seems to eat a slug
or prehistoric chuggy pig

daring robins flits beside us
hoping we’ll expose a worm or two
as we dig weeds and turn our soil
they love to splash en masse
in a plant pot saucer spa

but what happens at the end of the day?
perhaps our trees are secret cemeteries
with little niches full of tiny corpses in decay
have you ever wondered what happens to the birds
a blackbird fell at my feet today.

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It’s elemental

One of the most memorable destinations I’ve visited is India, a country of contrasts, it’s both backward and progressive. wealthy and poor, rainy and has monsoon and drought.

These little dwellings were in the Thar desert, Rajasthan.The earth was parched and only big old trees had any greenery. I can’t imagine how enough food was produced for people and livestock, but somehow they scrape an existence.

The air was filled with the sound of the helicopter flypass over  over Britannia Royal naval College, when my son passed out at the end of his officer training. It was a very proud mummy day, because he’d jumped from Chief Petty Officer to Sub-lieutenant.

I’ve chosen earth and air for Amy’s elemental Lens artist challenge this week, but you can choose fire, wood or water as well.

 

A work in progress

This year the front garden is getting some serious attention at last. For many reasons, its been neglected in recent years, and the longer something gets left, the harder it is to make a start isn’t it? It’s south facing, and slopes to a four foot wall above the path, so quite difficult to work in because its elevated.

This area leading to the front gate has a John Downie crab apple tree, lovely in blossom and with an abundance of pretty fruit. But the roots spread far and wide, so planting nearby is difficult. I’ve  cleared a lot of campanula, forget me not, marigolds and cerinthe, from here, all of which are sprouting again of course. I think I acquired the rhubarb some years ago and randomly planted there because I couldn’t think of anywhere else. It’s never produced very well though.

I’ve planted salvias, French lavender, Gaura, Scabious and  Osteospermum so far. The Japonica is self seeded from one that was dug up a few years ago.

Here’s my long suffering geranium, a favourite brought from my last garden, that’s being invaded by Wood Geum, a pest that I’m digging up everywhere.

A couple of exotics that are staying for now, unlike this one that took two days to dig up.

A couple of spaces waiting for some new plants,

This euphorbia is too big but I don’t know how to get it out without poisoning myself 🙂

and the lavender will dazzle in a few weeks time when the flowers spill over the wall.

House leeks and hardy geraniums are such generous plants, they haven’t minded being ignored.

Leading up to the front door is the space in front of the arch where I’ve taken out the monster. There’s a brand new clematis, but I’ll photograph it when it’s grown a little.

Meanwhile peep the other way. I know it looks untidy, but it’s getting there.

By the end of this summer I hope to have found some nice plants, so that next year it will look really nice. If my back can cope and if the Spanish bluebells don’t take revenge and multiply! So that’s what I’m up to, instead of blogging and visiting you my friends.

Pointing west

March 31st, where did the month go? Becky’s been hosting her March Square challenge and most of my squares have been pointy, rather than jagged, spiny, prickly or bristled. As I’ve missed lots of days I thought I’d post  6 squares today, all of them taken in my beloved Devon and Dorset.

 

All my entries are pointy, let me know if they’re not obvious.

With many thanks to Becky for a great challenge, there’s been so many fabulous photos.

A new orchard

How long does it take for an apple tree to reach maturity? I hope that in a few years I can try the fruit of every one of the young trees that have been planted in the valley park. Yes, an orchard’s worth of trees, I counted 22, each different varieties. They are all old English varieties, most local to the south west and some from just a few miles away.

There’s Farmer’s Glory, a Devon eating or cooking apple, that stores for three months. Exeter Cross, a mix of Worcester Pearmain and Beauty of Bath, an early fruit. Star of Devon comes from Broadclyst, just around four miles from the valley and the fruit lasts until March.
I’ll be watching these young trees grow, isn’t it wonderful that orchards are being created again?


ludwelllife.org.uk

Around Cezanne’s Neighborhood

I’d wanted to check out Cezanne’s neighbourhood for ages and last year I finally made it to Aix, on a bus from Marseilles.

I’m fire fighting at the moment so only have time to post a gallery.

But I hope you like it anyway.
If you haven’t seen them, Tina has beautiful photos taken of Seabrook Island, South Carolina for her challenge of ‘Neighborhood’.

Why take the 15 mile way home if you can take the 30?

An amusing little blast from this blog’s past !

Lucid Gypsy

Otherwise known as Lucid Gypsy rambling.

Last evening I went out with two of my closest friends. It’s a monthly event, we take turns driving, so that in theory two of us can have a couple of drinks, but actually we don’t drink much alcohol at all, it’s more about the chat and something to eat in a country pub. Two of us live about four miles apart and the other one lives fifteen miles away out in the sticks, and has done for around ten years. Jackie, the friend who lives nearest to me drove last night and sadly she doesn’t have the best sense of direction. Despite having been to Buckerell some 70 or 80 times she needs directions, but really its one straight main road, the A30, and then four miles up a narrow winding lane. We had a great evening with lots of fun, silliness and…

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