Curves inside and out

Cheri at the Daily Post has chosen the theme of curves for this weeks photo challenge. I have a friend who likes straight lines in imagery, but I’ll always choose the curves and swirls we find in nature, in any design or art.

I took this first photo a few weeks ago at Coldharbour Mill, in east Devon. It was leaning against a wall at the back of a courtyard and I had to capture it.

curvesa1Next, there’s a humpy hedge behind these curvy evergreens. Apparently when it was a baby hedge, there was a very harsh winter and it was weighed down by snow. The gardeners tried to repair it, but failed and knowing they’d lost the battle, they decided to allow it to grow it’s own curvy way.

curve2

A few weeks ago I posted a black and white version of some William Morris wallpaper,

curvy

There were several comments about the original colours, so here it is, colours, curves and even a well placed ceramic plate.

Weekly Photo Challenge, Admiration

This weeks photo challenge has the theme of admiration, I have a tremendous admiration for those creative people centuries ago, who left us a legacy of treasure, in the UK and worldwide.

chest
This sea chest has sailed the high seas, filled with wonders.

18c tureen
I can’t help wondering about the delicious meals that have been served from this tureen.

stitch
The embroidery around this four poster bed has graced the bed chamber for centuries, no daylight lamps or computerised sewing machines, just small hands and candlelight to work with. Click the link above to share whatever fills you with admiration!

Rhapsody in black and white

Paula’s Black and White Sunday theme this week is ‘Rhapsody’, this is what she says about the meaning,

Defined primarily as an instrumental composition irregular in form and suggestive of improvisation, then as an ecstatic expression of feeling or enthusiasm or an unusually intense or irregular poem/ piece of prose, rhapsody is also archaically known as a miscellaneous collection; jumble. 

And this is my interpretation.

nice ladies (2)

Gentle Urban Art

Paula has a weekly challenge where she invites us to post an image on a different them each week and I’m joining in for the first time. I’ve been lurking for a few weeks but this time I couldn’t resist as I love street art.

This is a bit different, subtle instead of bold, it’s subdued colours portray a time when Topsham was a busy fishing port.

urban

Paula can be found here if you’d like to join in.

Harmony with Nature

Michelle at the Daily Post describes harmony as,

“the quality of forming a pleasing and consistent whole.” 

There is a beautiful sculpture garden, Broomhill, that I’ve featured in the past, and when I saw that the challenge this week was Harmony, this photo popped out.

harmonySo perfectly placed

to reflect the harmony

of nature and art

Imitating Art

Cheri Lucas Rowlands says,

Artists are inspired by and capture the world around us: sculptors immortalize people with statues; painters record events in their masterpieces. What about the other way around? For this week’s theme, find inspiration in a piece of art, and go further: imitate it.

zimmer-biergarten

This painting by the German artist Wilhelm  Zimmer, of a village band reminded me of a photo I took in Kent a couple of years ago. The two images were created more than a hundred years apart, but I think there are some similarities, do you?

 

IMG_7975_edited-1

Quiet a difficult challenge this week, the relentless wind and rain doesn’t make me want to go out to take photos!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Circle

Cheri at the Daily Post says.

With 2016 officially here, we face forward to take on what’s next. It’s a time of endings and beginnings, so I wanted a broad theme that could be simple, fun, and festive, but also complex and introspective. And so, circle it is.

circle1

 

I found this circle? a few days ago at Escot, in east Devon. It’s part of a sculpture that as a whole, I didn’t find very exciting, but cropping the photo turned out a bit better I think.

The Igreja da Misericordia

A week ago I left you standing outside the church remember? Let’s have a peep inside today, in we go and turn around.
chu1
See the walls? they aren’t painted, they’re azulejos, traditional blue and white Portuguese tiles, and they were created in the 18th century. The Igreja da Misericordia is a 16th century Renaissance building, with an 18th century Baroque interior. On the walls the azulejos depict the Corporal and Spiritual Works of Mercy. There are seven on each side.


The left side

and the right. Here they are in situ.


You can probably tell that I was totally bowled over by the Igreja. I’ll show you some of the details that I loved.

When you visit the Igreja you are greeted warmly by a local lady. She gives a brief explanation of the inside. There is no entrance fee, but donations are welcome. Earlier that day, she said that very afternoon would be the best possible time to come back. So I’ll be back one last time to show you why.