Buckfast Abbey

 

I regularly drive past the sign for Buckfast Abbey, a place I hadn’t visited since I was a child fifty years ago. A return visit was long overdue.

abb1Benedictine monks first arrived there in the early 11th century, but the monastery was destroyed in 1539, during Henry V111th’s dissolution. In 1882 a group of French Benedictine monks settled there and a slow rebuild began.

This is what happened next.

abb10What an achievement.

abb2Impressive doors.

Once inside, initially I was distinctly underwhelmed, until I stopped comparing it to the Cathedral in Exeter. abb9The vaulting is different but interesting.

abb3
A beautiful screen.

And some pretty chapels.

abb6
Buckfast is a peaceful place, the part that filled me with joy was an amazing stained glass area, where photography was not allowed. I’d go back just to see that again. I did manage to buy a postcard of part of it, glass

But you will get a better idea here.

Now, once I went outside to the gardens, I really started to enjoy Buckfast. There’s a lavender garden, but it was past it’s best, as well as a sensory and a physic garden.

So this is Buckfast, a tranquil place to spend and hour or two. They have a restaurant and gift shop, as well as a conference centre. Visiting, and parking is free, so if you’re driving along the Devon Expressway why not call in?

I’m tempted to link to Jo’s Monday walk, because I didn’t sit down for a couple of hours even if i didn’t walk very far, and I don’t think she’ll tell me off!

 

Vintage Ashburton

So just now I was talking about Ashburton and it’s abundance of vintage shops, and it seemed rude not to show you.

And there were more!

Ashburton centre really only has two streets, but they are full of charm, here are some views.

So who’s a fan of vintage? if you are then you’d be in heaven in Ashburton. I’m not, it’s too twee for my taste. Having said that, I wouldn’t say no to an old typewriter or some cameras!

The Doors of Tavira

Last year, after a visit to Tavira in the Algarve, I posted about the interesting door knockers there. I always intended to post some photos of the equally interesting doors, but forgot all about it.

Any favourites? Mine is the one that say ‘6door’ when you hover over it.

Then I say Becky’s Thursday Doors post, which has beautiful doors from various places in Portugal, and a link to an earlier post with an almost identical photo to this one.
vib3
Like me she found it irresistible!
Do you have a passion for doors? I’ll always remember a silver one I saw in Rajasthan.

Morning in the Algarve

Imagine your typical morning. You might picture your favorite coffee mug. A streak of sunlight coming through your bedroom window. Or the roosters in your backyard that sound off at 5 am. Or a photo from breakfast of a pastéis de nata, a delicious Portuguese egg tart pastry, while on holiday in Lisbon?

This is Cheri’s challenge over at the Daily Post. Well, I can’t do Lisbon, but I can do pasteis de nata, in Vila Real de Santo Antonio!

por3While I was there, a peaceful morning called me to the riverside.

And here’s a blue sky Tavira morning

tav1and a low morning tide is good for harvesting shell fish in the Gilao river.

tav2You can join Cheri’s challenge here, and see lots of other entries that will inspire you.

A Library of Abstracts

When Jo and I walked around Birmingham last week, we were both struck by the architecture and interior of the library. We could both have spent hours there, but we dashed about, dazzled by the unexpected beauty in every direction. We tested funky chairs and colourful benches, took advantage of the facilities and peeped at Shakespeare’s memorial library. Here is a gallery of the interior, converted to black and white, I like the abstract look.

Jo, I can’t make any sense of the first picture, can you honey? I’ve tried turning it all ways!

Traces of the past

Paula’s back with her black and white Sunday challenge, and ‘Traces of the past’, will be a regular theme as it’s so popular – I love it!

I found these figures in a little church, St Mary the Virgin, in the village of Uffculme, Devon. The church was probably founded in Saxon times, but first gets mentioned in a charter of 1136. The figures are in 17th century costume.

uffculme-1-01
Paula is always happy to have people join in with her challenge, pop over and see her!