A Medieval Fayre and a Good Yarn

As many of you know, I’m a crafter and get to attend all sorts of fairs and events around Devon, One of my favourites takes place on the Saturday closest to Michaelmas, every September.

It’s Colyford Goose Fayre of course, and several thousand people visit, many dressed in Medieval costume. There’s an opening parade through the village, where everyone follows the mayor into Springfields.

ladies

Morris Dance is a must.

morrisStalls of all kinds with treats to buy.

I really wanted a besom, and not to sweep up with.

There are things to entertain the whole family, quintain, greasy pole, apple pressing, thatching displays and archery.

All kinds of foods are on offer, I can’t imagine how they got the pizza oven in place. As always the ram roast was a great success, but not for me. I planned to have some pancakes but left it too late and they were sold out, so I sulked and tried a chocolate brownie which was way too sugary and not chocolatey enough for my discerning palate, hey ho, such is life.

The stars of the fayre for me by far were these two guys.

storytellersThey have mischief written all over their faces!

This guy and his bouzouki accompany the storyteller.

And this is Dave, from Rattlebox. I only got to listen to one of his stories, the Boggart, but it was wonderfully told and I was hooked from the beginning. Hooray for Colyford Goose Fayre, it was a lovely day out!

 

 

Traces of the past

It’s Traces of the Past at Paula’s black and white Sunday this week, so I thought I’d bring this old weaving loom. I believe it’s from the early 1960’s.
totp189
It can be seen at Coldharbour Mill, in Devon.

The Weavers Song
The loom goes click and the loom goes clack
The shuttle flies forward and the shuttle flies back
The weaver’s so bent that he’s like to crack
Such a wearisome trade is the weaver’s

Now that it’s made into cloth at last
The ends of work they all make quite fast
The weaver’s labours for now have passed
Such a wearisome trade is the weavers.

Anon, circa the Industrial Revolution.

Does this look like . . .

your kind of garden?

hh2Hill House is a small, independent nursery at Landscove, Devon. Driving the last three miles to get there isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, it’s a single track lane with pull-ins in case you’re unlucky and meet a tractor. if you’re the passenger and don’t have to concentrate on the road, the views are spectacular. The road from the Devon Expressway takes you up Love Lane, Whistley Hill, Chuley Hill and Cabbage Hill!

hh3Hill House is really worth the drive, it’s the prettiest place, with unusual plants, very friendly people and the best cakes, all made on the premises.  hh4They don’t mind you wandering around the garden,

hh1On a sunny day it’s a peaceful spot for lunch, cream tea (cream first, then jam of course) or some of that cake. hh5The borders are densely planted, if you fall for something, you may find it in the nursery. hh6There are narrow paths that open up to little surprises.

hh7One of the paths leads to St Michael’s church.

hh8Which has a Victorian broached spire and is very pretty inside

hh9and has a Grade 11 listed, slate -roofed, buttressed lychgate.

hh10Back to the garden,

hh11For a last look down another path.

I’ll show you the nursery soon, I think you’ll love all the reclaimed items it has.

 

This is a scheduled post, be back soon.

Buckfast Abbey

 

I regularly drive past the sign for Buckfast Abbey, a place I hadn’t visited since I was a child fifty years ago. A return visit was long overdue.

abb1Benedictine monks first arrived there in the early 11th century, but the monastery was destroyed in 1539, during Henry V111th’s dissolution. In 1882 a group of French Benedictine monks settled there and a slow rebuild began.

This is what happened next.

abb10What an achievement.

abb2Impressive doors.

Once inside, initially I was distinctly underwhelmed, until I stopped comparing it to the Cathedral in Exeter. abb9The vaulting is different but interesting.

abb3
A beautiful screen.

And some pretty chapels.

abb6
Buckfast is a peaceful place, the part that filled me with joy was an amazing stained glass area, where photography was not allowed. I’d go back just to see that again. I did manage to buy a postcard of part of it, glass

But you will get a better idea here.

Now, once I went outside to the gardens, I really started to enjoy Buckfast. There’s a lavender garden, but it was past it’s best, as well as a sensory and a physic garden.

So this is Buckfast, a tranquil place to spend and hour or two. They have a restaurant and gift shop, as well as a conference centre. Visiting, and parking is free, so if you’re driving along the Devon Expressway why not call in?

I’m tempted to link to Jo’s Monday walk, because I didn’t sit down for a couple of hours even if i didn’t walk very far, and I don’t think she’ll tell me off!

 

Vintage Ashburton

So just now I was talking about Ashburton and it’s abundance of vintage shops, and it seemed rude not to show you.

And there were more!

Ashburton centre really only has two streets, but they are full of charm, here are some views.

So who’s a fan of vintage? if you are then you’d be in heaven in Ashburton. I’m not, it’s too twee for my taste. Having said that, I wouldn’t say no to an old typewriter or some cameras!

Dinosaurs and sand between your toes

If you’re three years old and the beaches near home are grotty shingle, when you feel sand between your toes for the first time, it can be quite overwhelming, you have to pause and take it all in.

fun2Especially if you’ve just met a life sized dinosaur and been on a train for the first time ever.

fun3

But when you’re one and a half, it’s still a bit mesmerising, but if daddy’s there to throw you up to the sky,
fun

then everything is really good fun!

A Seascape Framed

A seascape for Paula,

seascape

Paula says,

If you want to participate in Thursday’s Special challenge, link to this post and leave me links to your entries in the comment section bellow. Yesterday I started a poll where you can vote for your favourite “shadow” entry. The poll will be opened till next Wednesday, 17 August. For further themes and events please consult the Scheduled challenges page.

Traces of the past

Paula’s back with her black and white Sunday challenge, and ‘Traces of the past’, will be a regular theme as it’s so popular – I love it!

I found these figures in a little church, St Mary the Virgin, in the village of Uffculme, Devon. The church was probably founded in Saxon times, but first gets mentioned in a charter of 1136. The figures are in 17th century costume.

uffculme-1-01
Paula is always happy to have people join in with her challenge, pop over and see her!