Six Word Saturday

Late afternoon at St catherine’s Almshouse’s

Built in the 15th century to house thirteen poor men of the city

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Black and White Sunday, Structure

Paula continues her Black and White Sunday this week with the theme of ‘Structure’. I took this photo a few weeks ago, when I was showing my friend some of the historic sites in Exeter. This building dating from the early 15th century, was once the Merchant’s House, but is now commonly known as the House that Moved.

There’s an excellent article here, written by the very knowledgeable local historian, David Cornforth, that explains the name. On the right hand side of the page is another link, to a short film from the BBC archives, a great piece of history that would throw today’s health and safety officers into a real panic.

Traces of the past

Over to the west of Dartmoor a thatched cottage is growing out of the earth, or perhaps it’s sliding into the earth. Built in the 17th century this curved house has a passage through the middle, which might have been a division between house and livestock originally. It was the old post office for a period, and although it looks abandoned, there are also signs of work being done and the thatch seems to be in good condition. I hope it’s restored to it’s former glory, that would cost an awful lot of money.

Paula’s Thursday Special this week is traces of the past.

Black and white Sunday, typical

Driving around Dartmoor this evening, I spotted this Devon village green. It’s typical of the sort of place you find on the moor, with it’s Saxon stone cross. It looks as if nothing has changed for centuries, but apparently the cross was found in a barn and moved to the green in1985. It’s early Christian and has X’s and O’s engraved on it.

This is for Paula’s black and white Sunday typical theme, she has a dreamy image of Venice this week.

Hope and Renewal

Last year my city hit the national news when fire destroyed the Royal Clarence, the oldest hotel in the country. Now, seven months later work is taking place to make it safe and to protect the salvageable elements. The long term plan is a sensitive rebuild.

Hope and Renewal is a sculpture created from some of the burnt timber from the fire.

This charred wood can be traced way back to the 15th century and is my entry for Paula’s Black and White Sunday.

Traces of the past, Exeter’s City Wall

Parts of Exeter’s city wall is nearly 2000 years old, built in Roman times and nearly 70 % of it still exists. Through the centuries it has been repaired and added to many times. This section of the wall is close to where the Southgate would have been.There is archaeological evidence that the gate would have had two towers, being the area of the city most vulnerable to attack, because of its proximity to the river.
of the city

Roman wall

The building inside the wall is the White Ensign Club, for serving and ex-service men and women. Formerly the Holy Trinity Church and built in 1820, on the site of a much earlier church, and the King’s Prison.

The City Wall trail is around a mile, a nice way to see some historic elements of the city.

Join Paula’s Traces of the past, she’s in Venice this week!

 

Traces of the past, Bombardier Scattergood

The Theatre Royal in Exeter opened in 1886. Less than a year later, during a performance of Romany Rye, it fell victim to one of the worst fires in British theatre history. There are various opinions as to how many people were in the theatre at the time, but somewhere around 900 seems likely. Of those 900, some 180 died.

My photos show the memorials in my local cemetery, one over a mass grave, the other for Bombardier Scattergood, who at 25, died while attempting to rescue others.

Paula’s Black and White Sunday this week is ‘traces of the past’, a great way to look at history.

Thursday Special, Traces of the past

The El Born area of Barcelona is home to the Centre de Cultura i Memoria. The building was created on a site that was previously a fruit and vegetable market, opened in 1876 and the first cast iron market in the city. Sadly the market closed in 1971 and was unused for many years. Fast forward to 1994 and an archaeological excavation began, revealing traces of streets and houses from before 1714, when the city was sieged at the end of the war of Spanish Succession. The city surrendered to Philip V’s troops on September 11th that year, a date that is now Catalunya’s national day.

Some of the ancient streets that have been uncovered are on display in the cultural centre.

It was fascinating to see the roads and foundations of houses, imagining the lives of those who lived, worked and traded there.

This post is for Paula’s traces of the past, in colour this month.