Close up at the valley park

Ana-Christine has picked a very popular theme for the lens artist challenge this week’ it’s close up. She’s also made it very inclusive by highlighting how you don’t need an expensive camera.I’ve only taken my camera out once this year, but my phone is always with me.
With the challenge in mind I walked the dogs at the valley park yesterday.


I’m fascinated by the form and colour of lichen, the tiny drops of dew were a bonus. My phone has a selective focus option, and while I could have got a better result with my camera, Flora and George would have had more time to get into mischief!

In the valley park

Hedge laying is an ancient skill, it’s been around since the 16th century when landowners had to contain their livestock, because of the acts of enclosure. Different styles of laying can be seen around the country, and laying takes place in winter when there are no birds nesting and before the sap rises.

When I walked in the valley park this morning, the hedge between what I call the middle and bottom fields, had been recently laid. It’s opened up the view from the middle field at the rear of this photo way across the hills on the west of the estuary.

I’m glad the skills are still kept alive, but I can’t help wondering what the foxes make of it.

May 1942

On the night of 3/4 May 1942, just after midnight, 20 bombers arrived over the town centre, and in 70 minutes devastated the town centre and Newtown area. Bombs fell in High St, Sidwell St and Fore St, starting fires in the houses and shops there, which were soon out of control. Fire brigade and emergency services struggled to tame the fires, under the threat of unexploded ordnance and despite strafing by German bombers.[1] Reinforcements from the fire services at Torquay and Plymouth arrived to help; eventually 195 appliances and 1,080 personnel were employed to bring the fires under control, which was largely achieved by 5 May, though sporadic outbreaks continued until mid-day of 7 May.[1] 30 acres of the city were devastated, 156 people were killed and 583 injured.

Cornforth, David (10 March 2014). “The Exeter Blitz – April and May 1942”. Exeter Memories. Wikipedia.

Fifty years later,

Time passes, things change and people heal.

It’s day eleven of Becky’s #timesquare challenge for December, and there’s still time to join in