Sunday afternoon at Powderham

A wander around Chandni Chowk, the little plant centre and then tea and cake – courgette and avocado, no photo sorry.

The café looks across to the castle, home to the Earl and Countess of Devon.

Now if they could have just move the cars and arranged for the deer to be at the fence . . .

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A busy time

I’m missing lots of wonderful blogs posts! Apologies to those of you who I haven’t visited for a while, the last month has been full on crazy, but in a good way.

Here’s a photo from a trip to Dartmoor yesterday.

The light was lovely, then, as often happens up there, the mist arrived an hour later.

Happy Thursday!

Wild About Wool

A couple of months ago, I went to Poltimore House, and showed you the crumbling condition of the building. As part of the efforts being made to raise funds to restore the house, they have regular events, both inside and in the grounds.

Wild about wool was the event that made me decide to visit then.

There were members of the Devon Guild of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers.

Several felt makers, lots of knitting and crochet,

and even a royal wedding.

I’d never have the patience or skill to create work like this!

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge

Leya has posted some stunning photos this week, for her challenge of ‘fences’.  I really like the Tolkien quote she’s included, but I’ll let you find it for yourself.

Mine is a little wooden fence around a pretty thatched cottage in east Devon.

It would be a nice place for a holiday wouldn’t it?

Join Leya here.

A building in distress

The manor of Poltimore was bequeathed to the Bampfylde family by a Canon of Exeter Cathedral, at the end of the 13th century. It’s likely that a house was built on the estate, but no trace has been found near the present site. The current house was completed in the middle of the 16th century and was lived in by the family until 1920.

Since then it’s been a school, a WW2 evacuation centre and a hospital.

The house fell into a dilapidated state after an arson attack in 1987. This is how it looks now.

In 2000, a trust was set up to try to preserve the house. Half a million pounds was donated by English heritage, in 2009 to begin the restoration process. Sadly it will take an awful lot more to return it to o its full glory.