The High Lands of Orcombe

 

Orcombe Point at Exmouth marks the beginning of the Jurassic Coast, as well as being a part of the South West Coast Path. Start by walking east along the sea front until the road ends, in front of the red cliff. Look left and climb the zigzag path to the top.


There’s a bench or two along the way.

With plenty to see.

And these information circles dotted on the bank as you climb up the hill are an excuse to stop and breathe!

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It really isn’t very long before you reach the top.Where for a while the sea is out of view.

 

We pass a field where orchids are abundant in May.

Then look seawards again.

On a clear day you can see as far as Portland, but not this time. We’ve found these instead!

Who can play hopscotch?

I did it all the way to the needle, this bit’s for Meg.

If you start walking by the lifeboat station on Marine Drive, then up the cliff to the needle, it’s less than a mile and a half. If you keep going you reach Sandy Bay, with it’s caravan park in another mile. So this walk could take less that an hour, if only there weren’t such wonderful distracting views!

This little stroll is for Jo, my first Monday walk for a long time. Happy Monday Jo 🙂

 

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The Butterwalk

A row of former merchants houses and grade 1 listed buildings, the Butterwalk in Dartmouth has been standing since the early 17th century.

The structure features 11 eleven granite piers, originally 13. I’d guess the granite came from Dartmoor. There was some serious bomb damage in 1943, thankfully renovated a few years later.

It’s been ages since I’ve posted for the Weekly Photo Challenge!

Seven minutes on Exeter Quay

I find my self on the Quay, not early, but too soon for the shop I need. Nine am is ahead of the masses, but the light gleams perfectly for this  i-phonographer with seven minutes to while away.

The restaurants and bars are silent, in an hour aprons will be donned, veg chopped and scones baked.

Meanwhile the swans get ready for today’s bread throwing children and thank goodness there’s not a gull screech to be heard.

Looking down river I can imagine myself somewhere more exotic, but then again, this is my Exe, perfect and pretty in it’s own way.

Piazza Terracina, named for our twin city in Italy, will be buzzing through the day, with plenty of choices,

for coffee and a sit down,

and one the old lamps for the evening.

I’ve turned towards the canal basin now, where for the summer we have pop up theatre, the Bike Shed Boatshed, complete with caravan, perhaps for more intimate performances.

I wonder how this boat got it’s name, I doubt it’s come from Meg’s territory.

Exeter canal runs parallel to the river for a few miles. It was built on the 1560’s and is the oldest navigable canal in the country. The canal was commercially successful until the decline of the wool trade in the early 19th century, followed by the arrival of the railways.

Happy Monday everyone, I hope you’re having a good Bank Holiday.

 

Black and White Sunday

It’s Paula’s After Before week, she asks that we post the same image, in black and white and in colour. It’s a good way to see what works in monochrome, especially if like me, you don’t think of trying it.

Here’s my after, it’s not quite the usual reflection, the window had a stick on mirror so that the people inside could see out, but you can’t see in.

And before,

Any preference? Paula has a beautiful Corsican sea scene, take a look here.

Traces of the past

Over to the west of Dartmoor a thatched cottage is growing out of the earth, or perhaps it’s sliding into the earth. Built in the 17th century this curved house has a passage through the middle, which might have been a division between house and livestock originally. It was the old post office for a period, and although it looks abandoned, there are also signs of work being done and the thatch seems to be in good condition. I hope it’s restored to it’s former glory, that would cost an awful lot of money.

Paula’s Thursday Special this week is traces of the past.

Views of Dartmouth

One of this year’s birthday trips was a day at Dartmouth. We began with a hot chocolate and cinnamon toast at Alf’resco, then meandered gently along the narrow streets.

stopping to see the Lower Ferry,

and enjoy the view to Kingswear, via a very pretty garden, then on along the waterfront.

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The next stop is at Bayard’s Cove Fort, a single storey artillery fort built in the 1530’s as an extra defence against any invaders making it past the castle.

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The path climbs a little now, but that means nice views.

over on the bend

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Around the creek we continue towards the castle, which I think I showed you a few weeks ago.

I’ve never been inside, but I did get told off for peeping around the door in the picture below, it’s English Heritage and a man thought I was trying to sneak in without paying.
But we were hot and in need of ice cream, not dungeons! No photos I’m afraid, but mine was toffee fudge. We retraced our steps to summon the little ferry, turning the board around so that the ferryman could see he had passengers from the other side of the river.I rarely go on a boat, so it’s always a delight to see the view from one.

Lot’s of interesting and very expensive properties on both sides.

and there’s Bayard’s Cove Fort again.

Nearly back to town. Just ten minutes or so on the water, and it feels like a different world.

They’re still crabbing, I’d be a bit nervous if my child was sitting there. We’ve missed lunch, so we stroll towards the little harbour to see what we can find. No lunch, just a pasty and some new sunglasses for me!

It takes less than an hour to walk from the town to the castle, even taking lots of photos and view stops. Even though it’s short, I know that Jo will like it, for the boats if nothing else. She likes to walk on Mondays, or with her lovely daughter, last week they went to Rufford Abbey near Nottingham

 

Thursdays Special

Paula over at Lost in Translation has asked us to post photos of the same scene in landscape and portrait format. I often forget that I have a choice, and landscape is jut there isn’t it? I hope this challenge will make me thing more often about how totally different an image can be, just with a turn of the camera.

Any thoughts or preferences?