Wild About Wool

A couple of months ago, I went to Poltimore House, and showed you the crumbling condition of the building. As part of the efforts being made to raise funds to restore the house, they have regular events, both inside and in the grounds.

Wild about wool was the event that made me decide to visit then.

There were members of the Devon Guild of Weavers, Spinners and Dyers.

Several felt makers, lots of knitting and crochet,

and even a royal wedding.

I’d never have the patience or skill to create work like this!

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Over Scorhill Down

The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.

Marcel Proust

‘Big’ is this week’s Lens Artist Photo Challenge, check out Tina’s healthy jaws, but don’t get too close!

Lens-Artist Photo Challenge

Leya has posted some stunning photos this week, for her challenge of ‘fences’.  I really like the Tolkien quote she’s included, but I’ll let you find it for yourself.

Mine is a little wooden fence around a pretty thatched cottage in east Devon.

It would be a nice place for a holiday wouldn’t it?

Join Leya here.

A building in distress

The manor of Poltimore was bequeathed to the Bampfylde family by a Canon of Exeter Cathedral, at the end of the 13th century. It’s likely that a house was built on the estate, but no trace has been found near the present site. The current house was completed in the middle of the 16th century and was lived in by the family until 1920.

Since then it’s been a school, a WW2 evacuation centre and a hospital.

The house fell into a dilapidated state after an arson attack in 1987. This is how it looks now.

In 2000, a trust was set up to try to preserve the house. Half a million pounds was donated by English heritage, in 2009 to begin the restoration process. Sadly it will take an awful lot more to return it to o its full glory.

Hips and Haws

If you’re a certain age, you may have been given Rose Hip Syrup as a child. The bright red round and oval gems were used as a tonic to prevent winter colds because they’re rich in vitamin C. But did you also know they were baked in tarts, added to wine, marmalade and made into  soup? Best of all, they were used as anti varicose vein tea!

Now, the only thing I’ve ever done with haws is mix them with crab apples to make jelly, what about you? Well apparently, since Roman times the cheerful sprays of berries have been picked not just for jellies and jams, but to make wine and as a cure for the headaches that drinking might have caused! Women also gathered them for dyeing their hair, I touched mine up yesterday, I wonder if it’s worth a try.

I’ve always fancied myself as a medicine woman, a curandera, perhaps in a previous life.

Time to Relax

I wish, but I do have next week off so perhaps there’s hope.

Meanwhile I think I’m just in time to joins the Lens Artist Challenge this week, where Amy has chosen Time to Relax as this weeks theme.

In June I had a day out with my friend Sue, a belated birthday treat for me. We went to Burrow Farm Garden in east Devon. There happened to be a wedding there that day and we saw several guests who’d arrived early enjoying the garden in full bloom. On family intrigued me, A mum, dad and their two children who seemed quite untogether and un- smiley considering the event.

Every so often we’d turn a corner and even just a few feet away it was as if we were invisible. Anyway at one point we spotted the dad relaxing.

I expect he would have been even more grumpy if he knew I’d snapped him.