Shades of Ephesus

I posted a photo of the library of Celsus yesterday in black and white, and my inquisitive friend Jude wanted to know what colour it actually was.

Perhaps 2000 year ago, it might have been brighter, a warm rosey shade, we’ll never know. But here is what my camera saw.

Mystery solved Jude? By the way, the lady is Arete, goddess of virtue!

Advertisements

Celsus Ceiling

I’m joining Paula again this week, for her black and white day Sunday challenge. It has the theme of ‘Ceiling’, and I was tempted to post somewhere local, but then came across this photo taken at the library of Celsus, Ephesus, Turkey.

As it’s more than 2000 years old, perhaps it’s Paula’s oldest ceiling this week, we’ll see!

Black and White Sunday, Structure

Paula continues her Black and White Sunday this week with the theme of ‘Structure’. I took this photo a few weeks ago, when I was showing my friend some of the historic sites in Exeter. This building dating from the early 15th century, was once the Merchant’s House, but is now commonly known as the House that Moved.

There’s an excellent article here, written by the very knowledgeable local historian, David Cornforth, that explains the name. On the right hand side of the page is another link, to a short film from the BBC archives, a great piece of history that would throw today’s health and safety officers into a real panic.

Hope and Renewal

Last year my city hit the national news when fire destroyed the Royal Clarence, the oldest hotel in the country. Now, seven months later work is taking place to make it safe and to protect the salvageable elements. The long term plan is a sensitive rebuild.

Hope and Renewal is a sculpture created from some of the burnt timber from the fire.

This charred wood can be traced way back to the 15th century and is my entry for Paula’s Black and White Sunday.

Traces of the past, Exeter’s City Wall

Parts of Exeter’s city wall is nearly 2000 years old, built in Roman times and nearly 70 % of it still exists. Through the centuries it has been repaired and added to many times. This section of the wall is close to where the Southgate would have been.There is archaeological evidence that the gate would have had two towers, being the area of the city most vulnerable to attack, because of its proximity to the river.
of the city

Roman wall

The building inside the wall is the White Ensign Club, for serving and ex-service men and women. Formerly the Holy Trinity Church and built in 1820, on the site of a much earlier church, and the King’s Prison.

The City Wall trail is around a mile, a nice way to see some historic elements of the city.

Join Paula’s Traces of the past, she’s in Venice this week!

 

Thursday Special, Illusion

St Pancras church in the hear of Exeter sits right in the centre of a shopping centre. It’s built from Heavitree stone and is mostly 13th centuryn but with an 11th century font. It’s tiny, 46 x 16 feet, and is one of the oldest churches in the country with a chancel and nave.

As well as shops, it’s now surrounded by restaurants. I caught this i phone photo though the window of Comptoir Libanais. I’m not sure if the lady in the roof is real or just an illusion, maybe Paula will know, I’ve posted it for her Thursday special.

Traces of the past, Bombardier Scattergood

The Theatre Royal in Exeter opened in 1886. Less than a year later, during a performance of Romany Rye, it fell victim to one of the worst fires in British theatre history. There are various opinions as to how many people were in the theatre at the time, but somewhere around 900 seems likely. Of those 900, some 180 died.

My photos show the memorials in my local cemetery, one over a mass grave, the other for Bombardier Scattergood, who at 25, died while attempting to rescue others.

Paula’s Black and White Sunday this week is ‘traces of the past’, a great way to look at history.