A Lyme Bay Jurassic View

Jude’s  challenge this month is a bench with a view, naturally that’s impossible to resist. As far as I’m concerned, anywhere where there is a view of Lyme Bay is a winner and as it stretches for miles of Devon and Dorset there are loads of choices. This was taken on the south west coast path at Seatown , Dorset, where the Jurassic cliffs may reward you with a fossil or two if you’re patient and lucky.
seatown_1

Visit Jude here to join in.

Yesterday at Branscombe

The weather forecast got it right, yesterday was a blue sky day that shouted come and see me. So off we went, heading east to Branscombe, a little village on the coast between Sidmouth and Beer. A few years ago Branscombe hit the headlines because a huge container ship, the MS Napoli ran aground there spilling its cargo along several miles of coast line.

All is pristine now and once the long single track lane to reach Branscombe has been successfully navigated, it’s the perfect spot for some winter sun.

Sunday was a day that kept on giving, more tomorrow!

The Jurassic Coast . . .

. . . stretches for 95 miles from East Devon and all along the Dorset coastline. It isn’t just Jurassic, parts are Triassic and Cretaceous, each with different rock types. It’s a fossil hunters paradise, especially after one of the frequent landslides, with Charmouth and Lyme Regis areas the most likely places to find a little gem.
My end of the Jurassic coast is Exmouth, the furthest point West, where we have red sandstone that stretches along past a couple of estuaries and then abruptly changes to chalk at Beer and Lyme Regis. At Lyme you can look one direction and see chalk cliffs and east towards Charmouth, where the fresh landslides reveal fossils, in soft dark, grey, rock that feels almost like clay at times. Chalky stuff returns at Durdle Door and Lulworth.

The west end of the Jurassic coast
The west end of the Jurassic coast
The chalk begins
The chalk begins
Here you will walk large fossils in the rocks
Here you will walk on large fossils in the rocks
Like these!
Like these!
Lyme Regis looking east
Lyme Regis looking east
An area of recent slips
An area of recent slips
Here the fossils you find on the beach are in soft grey rock and mostly ammonites
Here the fossils you find on the beach are in soft grey rock and mostly ammonites
Further east the unspoilt beach at Eype
Further east the unspoilt beach at Eype
Layers of rock laid down overcountless  millenia at Lulworth cove
Layers of rock laid down overcountless millenia at Lulworth cove

So this is the Jurassic Coast World Heritage Site, a geological walk back through INFINITE time and its my entry for this weeks photo challenge, as well as an excuse to show off the beautiful of South West of England!

Join in at http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/10/11/photo-challenge-infinite/

Travel Theme: Curves

Ailsa has chosen curves for this week’s travel theme. The picture I have chosen was taken in Dorset, the Undercliff at Lyme Regis again. The beach is part of the Jurassic coast and the rock there was laid down 200-150 million years ago. I think this curvy beauty is an ammonite, but it also has several other fossils in the centre. They call the area where I photographed it the ammonite graveyard because there are many on the beach.

The fossil is around 18 inches wide!

Go visit Ailsa to see some more curves!