Over the Garden Wall at Nyman’s

ny27Yesterday I asked if you could guess what these Alliums were hiding. I think that a couple of you guessed what I meant.

ny21Here’s the house, beautiful isn’t it?

ny18Here’s the hedge behind the alliums.

ny25Fabulous reflections?

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Perhaps if we get a little closer.

ny22Some attention needed?

Here are some more alliums, and the very sad and hauntingly beautiful façade of the house.

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And another view.

ny26Where you can clearly see that there are very few glazed windows and no reflections . In 1947 Messel’s eldest son Lennie was at home, recuperating from surgery in one of England coldest winters. When the pipes were frozen, a plumber used a blow torch in an attempt to defrost them and a fire broke out. By the time the fire brigade arrived the house was engulfed and those same frozen pipes prevented access to the water needed. Most of the house was lost, as well as several generations of the families treasured collections, including art, horticultural books and irreplaceable items. Just a few rooms and the garden remained intact.

In 1987, Nyman’s fell victim to another disaster. When the great storm hit the country, 486 trees, many rare and very old were lost. By then the National Trust owned the garden and rather than see it as a total disaster, the hurricane damage was seen as an opportunity for regeneration. A garden is never finished and the work at Nyman’s, as in any garden, continues into the future.

ny20If you’re quick, you can see a BBC4 programme, British Gardens in Time, on i player. It tells the history of the garden and the Messel family and is available for about three weeks. Jude, you’ll love the programme if you have time, but otherwise I hope you enjoy your time there. I kind of did these posts on purpose, so that you would visit and photograph it in it’s late summer glory.

For now, I’ll leave you all with the picture of the pretty dove cote.