Being a tour guide

What do I love about where I live, is the question asked by Krista, for this week’s photo challenge of tour guide. So where would take visitors to my city, where have I actually taken them? Well it depends on their interests and there are lots of choices. Perhaps I’d start by the quay. We’d walk down from the crescent,

stoping to admire this view

splash out 20p for the ferry across the river

stand beside one of the Victorian lamp posts looking towards the pubs and cafes, as well as the transit shed. Then perhaps stroll towards the Port Royal, for a coffee or lunch.

We’ll cross the suspension bridge at Trew’s weir,

Go full circle, don’t worry it’s less than a mile.

Exeter was once a thriving port, we’ll cross back to the old custom’s house, via the little wooden  bridge. Mallisons’ bridge was paid for by a Professor Mallison, who left his money to the city. You often have to dodge the swans there, they get a bit pesky hoping for food.

We’re going to have a little jaunt to Topsham next, shall we go by train, bus or shank’s pony? Umm, the bus is quickest, we want to squeeze as much in as we can.

Here we are, on Topsham quay now, just a couple of miles down the Exe.

We seem to have done a little time travelling, just because I like the sunsets there.

Now, we have no choice but to walk, down to Bowling Green Marsh.

Becky would like it there, it’s a resting place for migratory birds, if you time it right. There are widgeons and lapwings in this photo, but it isn’t very clear. Bring some binoculars and you might see quite a collection of species, avocet are common, osprey are sometimes around.

We’ll catch the bus back to town.

Nice view in August as you pass Dart’s farm, they grow sunflowers to raise money for Hospiscare.

We haven’t been more than four miles from the centre of the city now let’s head for the heart. Jump off the bus in High Street.

Turn down Ship Lane and into Cathedral Close, where it’s strangely dark.

I love this ancient oak door it leads to the Bishop’s Palace.

And no visit to the city is complete without going into the cathedral,

so here’s my favourite Lady Chapel.

On y soit qui mal y pense etc. etc.

Hope you like my city, you’ve probably guessed how much I love it! I’m also hoping to attract a certain someone down here, no prizes!

Thursday Special, pick a word

Pick a word from five, or choose all of them if you like, says Paula at Lost in Translation for her Thursday Special. The choices are, innate, protuberant, fluorescent, rectangular and interspersed. She has five great shots, my favourite of which is fluorescent. I intended to use rectangular, but then scrolling through for ideas, I realised how interspersed these photos of Dawlish Warren are.

The brown, wintery sea at the Warren is interspersed with white foam,

The beach is interspersed with groins.

and people, and on the other coast at Exmouth the view is interspersed with houses, trees, seaside entertainment venues.

My lovely boodle

Jen asks that we share a photo or several of something that is dearly loved for the weekly photo challenge. Leaving family aside and small objects of desire, it’s not easy to pick. No surprisingly I’ve seen a few photos of pets and so I’ve decided to do the same.

If you’re an animal lover of a certain age, there’s a high chance you’ve experienced the loss of a pet at some time in your life. Last year it happened to me – twice in quick succession and while the edge of the pain has faded, whenever I come across a photo of Dido and Daisy, the tears are never far behind.

But then in July new puppies arrived. The moment my eyes met Flora’s she was mine and the moment Flora’s eyes met mine, I was hers.

She’s impossible to take photos of, dark eyes hide behind dark fur and she moves swift as light.

So, she’s my beloved Boodle (border terrier cross miniature poodle’, her brother George who belongs to my housemate, comes a very close second.

 

 

It could be you one day

The early days of Lucid Gypsy, and no one even saw this post 😦
Happy Saturday eveyone!

Lucid Gypsy

I met an elderly man today. He had come to out-patients for one of years of appointments in cardiology, nephrology and the eye unit. He had a sparkle in his eye, stains on his shirt and his trouser fastenings were quite suspect, but I liked him. He chatted to me about his ailments and I helped him to sort through his paperwork amongst which was a poem. I tried to peep at it but couldn’t quite see, and after a while he offered it to me, saying that it was about the ageing process and he had ‘adapted’ it to include bits about his health. You can Google the original, it’s called ‘The shape I’m in’and each stanza ends with those words.

I could see behind him that someone was shifting from foot to foot, a young medic who probably hadn’t yet been on a geriatric ward. Now, whenever someone…

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