Lazy and late poet’s Thursday haiku

Nature’s brightest pink

poison blossom of autumn

this siren of shrubs

 

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The Butterwalk

A row of former merchants houses and grade 1 listed buildings, the Butterwalk in Dartmouth has been standing since the early 17th century.

The structure features 11 eleven granite piers, originally 13. I’d guess the granite came from Dartmoor. There was some serious bomb damage in 1943, thankfully renovated a few years later.

It’s been ages since I’ve posted for the Weekly Photo Challenge!

Seven minutes on Exeter Quay

I find my self on the Quay, not early, but too soon for the shop I need. Nine am is ahead of the masses, but the light gleams perfectly for this  i-phonographer with seven minutes to while away.

The restaurants and bars are silent, in an hour aprons will be donned, veg chopped and scones baked.

Meanwhile the swans get ready for today’s bread throwing children and thank goodness there’s not a gull screech to be heard.

Looking down river I can imagine myself somewhere more exotic, but then again, this is my Exe, perfect and pretty in it’s own way.

Piazza Terracina, named for our twin city in Italy, will be buzzing through the day, with plenty of choices,

for coffee and a sit down,

and one the old lamps for the evening.

I’ve turned towards the canal basin now, where for the summer we have pop up theatre, the Bike Shed Boatshed, complete with caravan, perhaps for more intimate performances.

I wonder how this boat got it’s name, I doubt it’s come from Meg’s territory.

Exeter canal runs parallel to the river for a few miles. It was built on the 1560’s and is the oldest navigable canal in the country. The canal was commercially successful until the decline of the wool trade in the early 19th century, followed by the arrival of the railways.

Happy Monday everyone, I hope you’re having a good Bank Holiday.

 

Black and White Sunday, Structure

Paula continues her Black and White Sunday this week with the theme of ‘Structure’. I took this photo a few weeks ago, when I was showing my friend some of the historic sites in Exeter. This building dating from the early 15th century, was once the Merchant’s House, but is now commonly known as the House that Moved.

There’s an excellent article here, written by the very knowledgeable local historian, David Cornforth, that explains the name. On the right hand side of the page is another link, to a short film from the BBC archives, a great piece of history that would throw today’s health and safety officers into a real panic.