The Details on Guell

I went to Park Guell last year, but my friend didn’t so that was a great excuse to go again! But I won’t bore you with more of the same, instead, I’ve created a gallery of some of the smaller details, the Trencadis mosaics.

It’s commonly believed that Gaudi, Park Guell’s architect, invented the Trencadis modernist style, but it’s more likely that it originated in the ancient Arab world. I’ve tried mosaic work, just making a house number. The result was pretty good, but it was very hard on my hands, and I wouldn’t want to do it again. I can’t imagine the number of hours it must have taken to create Park Guell.

Through the surf darkly

I went to the coast today, this is what I saw

and this is what I was inspired to write.

They stand tense in the knowledge

that feet giving way

would trap twist betray

one distracting sound that might pierce

the rage of ocean on rock

to knock them like dominoes.

each yearn to go further

to be the brave stepper

cheering risk taking surfers

while surreptitiously wondering

would the sea turn red

if instead of a wave

a skull breaks on the strand


His Master’s Voice

There’s a whole industry built around the current passion for anything vintage. It seems that even young people like to wear clothes from their grandparents era and even earlier. I went to a vintage fair a couple of years ago with a friend who is very keen. personally I like to look but wouldn’t want to own or wear anything from the past. i did see some interesting things though, this was one of my favourites.

His Master's Voice
His Master’s Voice

Are you a vintage fan? If yo have photos you can join this weeks photo challenge at The Daily Post.

A Few More Pretty Things

Yesterday, for my LPTH I posted a photo of some wicker garden decorations. Several people wondered about their size and purpose, so I thought I should show you some more.

These fish are about a foot long and on stems of perhaps three foot. Aren’t they adorable? They’d look great beside a pond. Yesterdays mystical birds are taller, on stems of six foot, to sway gently in the breeze. in a tall border perhaps. Which do you prefer?

A Medieval Fayre and a Good Yarn

As many of you know, I’m a crafter and get to attend all sorts of fairs and events around Devon, One of my favourites takes place on the Saturday closest to Michaelmas, every September.

It’s Colyford Goose Fayre of course, and several thousand people visit, many dressed in Medieval costume. There’s an opening parade through the village, where everyone follows the mayor into Springfields.


Morris Dance is a must.

morrisStalls of all kinds with treats to buy.

I really wanted a besom, and not to sweep up with.

There are things to entertain the whole family, quintain, greasy pole, apple pressing, thatching displays and archery.

All kinds of foods are on offer, I can’t imagine how they got the pizza oven in place. As always the ram roast was a great success, but not for me. I planned to have some pancakes but left it too late and they were sold out, so I sulked and tried a chocolate brownie which was way too sugary and not chocolatey enough for my discerning palate, hey ho, such is life.

The stars of the fayre for me by far were these two guys.

storytellersThey have mischief written all over their faces!

This guy and his bouzouki accompany the storyteller.

And this is Dave, from Rattlebox. I only got to listen to one of his stories, the Boggart, but it was wonderfully told and I was hooked from the beginning. Hooray for Colyford Goose Fayre, it was a lovely day out!



Santa Eulalia’s Geese

The day we arrived in Barcelona we were shattered, but determined to hit the streets after a bit of a snooze. Wanting to get out of the Ramblas as soon as possible, seeing a sign for the cathedral seemed a good idea. The Catedral de la Santa Creu i Santa Eulàlia as it’s called in Catalan, was on the must see list.

We soon became distracted by the sights and sounds of the city, but knew we must be heading in the right direction, and once cooled by an ice cream we soon found it.

 But it had just closed, so we had to wait half an hour, which we spent people watching on the steps.

Eventually we were allowed in, to admire the Gothic vaults built between the 13th and 15th centuries.

bac4Remembering to look in all directions.

bac5The Cathedral, which is the seat of the bishop of Barcelona, is known for its rather unusual cloisters and I have to confess that was what particularly drew me. There’s an odd looking fountain, but in the background . . .

Yes, geese, thirteen of them, representing the age of Santa Eulalia when she was martyred in Roman times.

Despite the crowds, the cloister was an extraordinary peaceful place, and it warranted more time than our tiredness would allow. Maybe next time.

bac9In the absence of any food, I think she would have been happy to chat.

I’m leaving you with this beautiful Madonna and Child, there was something about her that touched me, I hope you can see it too.