Five Day Black and White Challenge Day One

Cotehele is a Tudor manor house on the banks of the river Tamar, just over the border in Cornwall. It houses wonderful collections of oak furniture, arms and armour and tapestries inside its granite walls. Over the centuries it has been visited by Kings and Queens and more than one bed names a royal personage who has slept in it.

Carved oak headboard
Carved oak headboard

Here is the original photo, before it was cropped, straightened and colour converted.
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Thanks to Issy for choosing me to take part, see her entries http://isadoraartandphotography.com/2015/02/15/5-day-bw-challenge-day-2/
Now, the challenge is to post a black and white image each day for five (I may take longer than five days to post five images) and to choose someone else to take part. For day one I’d like to choose Meg, she is currently on a long holiday in Poland and has lots of lovely photos to share taken in Warsaw. https://warsaw2015.wordpress.com/

Don’t panic if I pick you, relax and take part if you want to!

The Great Hall at Cotehele

Cotehele is a Tudor manor house built between 1485 and 1539, high above the banks of the river Tamar in Cornwall. It was owned by the same family- the Edgcumbes,for six hundred years and is one of the best preserved Medieval manors in the country. They rebuilt the original 13th century property, before creating an even grander home a few miles away at Mount Edgcumbe, so Cotehele was little used and hardly changed over the centuries. The house became National Trust property in 1947 in lieu of death duty.
Today I’m showing you some of the armoury to be fond in the Great Hall.

And some other items I liked.

I’ll be back in a few days with some more photos of the house and garden.

Looking Through the Squint

I’ve had a really lovely weekend, full of creativity and sunshine. Yesterday I went to a National Trust property just over the border in Kernow – Cornwall. They say that Cotehele probably originated around 1300 but most of the building took place in the late 15th century. I’ll post some more photos later but meanwhile here’s a little squint. A squint is a small peephole built into a wall, so that that owner could look down on other rooms to check what people were up to, they were often added in mediaeval times. At Cotehele this on looks down on the Great Hall.

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