Six Word Saturday

Dawlish railway line, two years on.

dawlish

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Dawlish trainline, checking for progress

For the 100 word challenge for grown ups this week  I wrote about  the storm damage to the trainline at Dawlish. I’ve since been to see how things are going, but it was no surprise that I couldn’t get very close. Here are some phone pics.

Dawlish is a quaint little seaside town ful of old -fashioned charm.

The train journey west continues to Teignmouth and from there you can get a ferry to Shaldon. I ‘ve posted about both in the past.

https://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2012/01/02/teignmouth-my-last-day-off/

https://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2013/10/12/starting-and-finishing-with-boats/

The workmen at Dawlish told me that the completion date for repair of the train track and sea wall is just before Easter, good news for locals and visitors alike.

100 Word Challenge for Grown Ups Week# 123

Julia’s prompt is related to a TV programme this week, but I’ve never seen it so I’m rambling off on my own with non-fiction instead! The words she gave us are . . . but surely it is pointless

100wcgu-7 Not the End of the Line

160 years ago Isambard Brunel engineered the South Devon section of the GWR, a bold construction, four miles of which runs between cliffs and the open sea. Who knows if climate change has caused the tide to turn, hurling that ocean across his railway, battering the cliffs and everything in between, but surely it’s pointless to try to defeat nature?

The journey is beautiful; thankfully Dawlish is getting its heart back. Why not make the line a tourist and leisure route? Billions will be spent either way, but it’s time to build a brand new inland route, to ensure that the South West’s infrastructure is fit for the future.

If you live in the UK, you’ll know what I’m talking about, if not,

http://www.exeterexpressandecho.co.uk/Pictures-Network-Rail-offer-scenes-glimpse-work/story-20710605-detail/story.html

and here in an earlier post , some views  from part of the South Devon railway journey, https://lucidgypsy.wordpress.com/2013/06/07/fleeting-a-minute-from-the-train/

To join Julia’s challenge this week, http://jfb57.wordpress.com/2014/02/24/100-word-challenge-for-grown-ups-week123/

Weekly Photo Challenge: Solitary

I knew exactly what I would share with you when I saw the theme this morning. This solitary black swan has been around the river for a year or so,  and Fifi as she is known, hit the local newspaper this week because she is lonely. There are lots of mute swans on the Exe and the canal, but of course black swans are native to Australia, not Britain. When I saw her last year, I assumed she had made her way up river from Dawlish, where there has been a colony for decades. Apparently not though, she is not ringed and it’s thought that she may have escaped from a private garden. She has been nest building but has no mate, the local birds have attacked her and she is probably feeling terribly rejected. The Dawlish swan herd says that she should be taken there, but that it would be costly to capture and move her and so far no one has offered to pay. I hope the newspaper article prompts a donation from a wealthy bird lover! Here she is. There are lots more interpretations of solitary over at The Daily Post