Hips and Haws

If you’re a certain age, you may have been given Rose Hip Syrup as a child. The bright red round and oval gems were used as a tonic to prevent winter colds because they’re rich in vitamin C. But did you also know they were baked in tarts, added to wine, marmalade and made into¬† soup? Best of all, they were used as anti varicose vein tea!

Now, the only thing I’ve ever done with haws is mix them with crab apples to make jelly, what about you? Well apparently, since Roman times the cheerful sprays of berries have been picked not just for jellies and jams, but to make wine and as a cure for the headaches that drinking might have caused! Women also gathered them for dyeing their hair, I touched mine up yesterday, I wonder if it’s worth a try.

I’ve always fancied myself as a medicine woman, a curandera, perhaps in a previous life.

Advertisements

Happy January

Happy New Year!

So it’s January 1st 2018, the darkest month begins, I’m already longing for spring and today I found it, yes hooray for catkins, hazel ones I believe!

Here’s a little winter tip for you from Mrs Beeton, she suggests that,

‘At this time of year sensible females should examine their paper or muslin bags of seeds for mould, maggots and other such undesirables’

In case you’ve begun the year feeling under the weather, in 1968, The National Federation of Women’s institutes shared an Old Channel Island remedy for coughs,

Collect 20 snails from crevices in walls, half a pound moist brown sugar. Leave snails in a bowl to clean themselves. Remove and place live snails in muslin bag with the sugar. Leave to drip overnight. Bottle liquid and use a tablespoon as required.

Do you think it was meant to be swallowed or rubbed in?