Hips and Haws

If you’re a certain age, you may have been given Rose Hip Syrup as a child. The bright red round and oval gems were used as a tonic to prevent winter colds because they’re rich in vitamin C. But did you also know they were baked in tarts, added to wine, marmalade and made into  soup? Best of all, they were used as anti varicose vein tea!

Now, the only thing I’ve ever done with haws is mix them with crab apples to make jelly, what about you? Well apparently, since Roman times the cheerful sprays of berries have been picked not just for jellies and jams, but to make wine and as a cure for the headaches that drinking might have caused! Women also gathered them for dyeing their hair, I touched mine up yesterday, I wonder if it’s worth a try.

I’ve always fancied myself as a medicine woman, a curandera, perhaps in a previous life.

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13 thoughts on “Hips and Haws

  1. That takes me back a bit! I remember eating haws them straight off the bushes on the way to school. It was the one thing that wasn’t forbidden me. I used to walk through paths lined with blackberries and raspberries (we didn’t call them wild, then, because nobody we knew would think of growing them in their garden) which I loved to eat but my mother was constantly worried about my stomach. She needn’t have, I have an enormous capacity for fresh fruit which never seems to cause me any harm. But hips, yes, Grandma made her own rose-hip syrup, and a tea (which I never had, it was for ‘grown-ups). I have a feeling that haws were fed to the horses when they had colic or something. It’s so far back in the memory I can’t quite recall it.

    1. about eight years ago – cod liver oil rescued my skin – one tablespoon a day helped me moisturize from inside out (and who know what else it did for immunity)

  2. hair dye and hangover remedy – pretty cool stuff.
    I have a bottle of rose hip essential oil on my shelf – think i will add it to something later – thx

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