A Walk at Morte Point

Last weekend my friend Lindy and I went for a walk up in north Devon. I wanted to go to see Verity at the same time so I found a walk on the coast that was just 2.3 miles, perfect for the Dido and Daisy as well.

We arrived at Mortehoe, a pretty village, just before noon and walked up the road between the pub and church.

Mortehoe village
Mortehoe village

The lane climbing upwards was trimmed with spring wild flowers.

Wildflowers in the hedgerow
Wildflowers in the hedgerow

And the walls were full of life.

Navelwort waiting to bloom Jude
Navelwort waiting to bloom Jude

We walked past a pretty cemetery.

Cemetery with a view
Cemetery with a view

And the walk began

Back to the path

Looking west
Looking west
That's close enough to a sheer drop
That’s close enough to a sheer drop

There were sheep everywhere and the lambs were adorable

The lambs were at the toddler stage
The lambs were at the toddler stage

The path stretched ahead into bright sun.

The south west coast path
The south west coast path
Woolacombe is fading into the distance
Woolacombe is fading into the distance

We stopped frequently so the dogs could cool down, so I zoomed in again.

Something strange over there
Something strange over there

Can you see the stegosaurus back bone?

By now we were warming up, and wishing we’d brought all of our picnic lunch, instead of just a packet of crisps. But the walk was lovely in every direction.

Deceiving but a very steep drop
Deceiving but a very steep drop

There were some interesting rock formations.


The crest of the hill in the photo above was soon just above us.

The stegasaurus
The stegasaurus

Some suicidal sheep!

Sure footed sheep
Sure footed sheep

 

Not far to the point
Not far to the point
One more bend
One more bend

The rock was changing colour as we walked east towards Morte Point.

Made it at last

Morte Point
Morte Point

Morte, as I’m sure you know means death and it’s believed that Morte point got its name because the treacherous rocks caused a number of shipwrecks over the centuries. Smuggling was rife, and some of the wrecks may have been helped along the way by wreckers walking the coast with lamps to confuse the sailors in the dark. Having seen this rcraggy coastline, it must have been incredibly dangerous. According to the South West Coast Path website,

The Normans dubbed it the ‘Death Stone’, and claimed that ‘Morte is the place which heaven made last and the devil will take first.’

Time to head on.

Going east again
Going east again

The walk continued steeply.

Shallow water
Shallow water

My camera captured seals here but just as dark bobbing blobs.

The seals didn't want to sunbath
The seals didn’t want to sunbath

We were out of water and fairly certain that we’d missed a turning by the time we reached here.

The turning point
The turning point

But a slight hint of a path up to the right led us back the way we needed to take.

Familiar ground
Familiar ground

The gate leads through to the road by the cemetery.
nd35

The village shop supplied cold drinks and ice cream, which we followed with our picnic. The dogs flopped in the shade, tired but happy. The pedometer on my phone said I’d walked 5.5 miles, not the planned 2.3, but we stilled had some energy left to pootle around Ilfracombe.
I don’t know if Jo will be doing her Monday Walk this week but there’s always another day.

Weekly Photo Challenge: Future Tense

Michael Pick says, ‘We spend so much of our lives thinking back, or looking ahead, and even though a photo captures only one moment in time, with a bit of thought it can freeze the process of moving forward, or the promise of things to come. Your challenge this week is to seal one such moment in amber’ and invites us to share to join the http://dailypost.wordpress.com/2013/03/22/weekly-photo-challenge-future-tense/
I thought this was an impossible task at first, but then I came up with these.

2013 Jan 06_2909

A connecting extension to a favourite walk.

2013 Jan 20_2777

On the strip of ground between the river Exe above and the canal, out of sight on the left, Devon County Council are building a new world class outdoor education centre in Exeter. The spiral stairs to the left are the way up the abseil tower which was nearly completed when I took this photo in January and the centre is due to open in April. A real investment in the future.

DSC_0156

This is sadly a bit more worrying. The South West Coast Path is a 630 mile walk, one of Britains National Trails. The Devon Red Sandstone section here at Sidmouth which climbs sharply eastwards has been closed because of erosion. The path has become unstable in several places, and some homes are at risk of plunging over the cliff. Diversions are in place for walkers until more permanent plans are made.