Working for my choccy

After a few hours shopping in Totnes yesterday, I really needed a sit down with a hot drink and a cake.  So my friend and I went to the Green Café,  ordered hot chocolate, and  a rock cake to share. While we were waiting I spotted this sign image http://www.kascare.org/ and thought okay I can do that. image Then the drinks arrived image Or rather the ingredients image So I had to stop knitting image and start mixing

Choccy done
But in the end it was delicious. Have you ever had to mix your own hot chocolate in a café? It was certainly different for me, but at least it proved it was the real thing and not some instant stuff!

The rock cake was pretty good as well but it wasn’t around long enough for a photo 🙂

Converging Stone Rows

Photos are visual spaces where shapes and lines, objects, and people come together, says Ben Huberman at the Daily Post and he asks for photos with the theme of ‘Converge’. I find the bronze age stone rows on Dartmoor fascinating, imagine the people that created these way back in time. My photo shows some of the stone rows that converge at the top of the hill above Scorhill circle heading towards Batworthy and Fernworthy.

converge
If you have photos that converge – and who doesn’t? share them here.
http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/converge/

Angular St Annes

St Annes Chapel has stood on the edge of town for 596 years and I don’t know how many times I’ve walked past barely noticing it.  As a teenager, I even had to walk past daily to school, just around the corner. In recent years it’s been refurbished and although I didn’t go inside because I was dog walking, I could see that the courtyard looks lovely. The chapel is actually the building on the left as the back of the picture, while the white timbered buildings are alms houses.  Exeter was a prosperous town as far back as the 16th century, as the biggest city in Devon it was the centre of the county’s woollen trade. Hence the chapel was named St Annes, as she is the patron saint of weavers.

Like many of the oldest buildings in Exeter, the chapel and alms houses were built from red Heavitree  stone, quarried less than two miles away, close to where I grew up.  Today as I peeped through the gate the winter sun was bright and casting long shadows.

St Annes

That’s when I noticed the angular shapes all around the courtyard, even those shadows,

Angular St Annes

The chapel is now part of the orthodox Parish of the Holy Prophet Elias, and its website says that the parish belongs to the Archdiocese of Orthodox Parishes of Russian tradition in Western Europe under the Ecumenical Patriarchate.
This is my second entry for the photo challenge of ‘Angular’ over at http://dailypost.wordpress.com/dp_photo_challenge/angular/

Park regeneration

In October 1987, Michael Fish a now infamous BBC weather presenter, told the UK not to worry, there wouldn’t be a hurricane, but there would be some strong winds further south in France and Spain. In the event, winds of up to 115mph caused £1 billion of damage and 15 lives were lost.
In my city, many trees came down including a number in Heavitree Park. When I was five years old, my daily walk to and from school took me through the park and I remember those huge, majestic trees standing guard over the gentle sloping landscape gardens. Each September I’d collect conkers from under the horse chestnuts and watch the squirrels collecting nuts for their winter larders. You can imagine how upset I was all those years later when I walked Jassy, my golden retriever through the park, a few days after the hurricane that wasn’t going to happen.
park
If you look closely you can see the stump of one of the old trees, see how big it was?
park1
park2
The park has never been quite the same for me, but I can walk there without tears now. Thankfully, a few of the old trees, including these above, survived that dreadful night.
A couple of years later the council planted a small grove of birch, carefully fenced off to protect them at first. They have now grown to maturity and are a lovely sight. So yesterday I walked Dido and Daisy, the border terriers early in the morning, before the November fog had cleared. They chased the squirrels – futilely of course, and I only had my phone camera but I had to share the young trees with you.

I hope they never have to stand up to a hurricane.