Sungai Kinabatangan

The word delta has always conjured up images in my mind of powerful rivers flowing into the sea. The Nile, the Niger and the Mississippi, exciting places that make me think of the great explorers of days gone by.

Erica at the Daily Post throws wide the definition of delta, she says,

This week, share a photograph that signifies transitions and change to you. It can be the very beginning of a phase, or the very end. As you pick up your lens, explore the ways in which a single photograph can express time, while only showing us a small portion of any given moment.

so I’ve taken advantage a little with my photo.

The Kinabatangan in Borneo rolls into the sea near Sandakan, Sabah. I was there in 2009, taking this photo five minutes before landing.

I love how the river swirls, curves, and seems to turn back on itself, an unstoppable force heading for the Sula sea.

 

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Views of Dartmouth

One of this year’s birthday trips was a day at Dartmouth. We began with a hot chocolate and cinnamon toast at Alf’resco, then meandered gently along the narrow streets.

stopping to see the Lower Ferry,

and enjoy the view to Kingswear, via a very pretty garden, then on along the waterfront.

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The next stop is at Bayard’s Cove Fort, a single storey artillery fort built in the 1530’s as an extra defence against any invaders making it past the castle.

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The path climbs a little now, but that means nice views.

over on the bend

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Around the creek we continue towards the castle, which I think I showed you a few weeks ago.

I’ve never been inside, but I did get told off for peeping around the door in the picture below, it’s English Heritage and a man thought I was trying to sneak in without paying.
But we were hot and in need of ice cream, not dungeons! No photos I’m afraid, but mine was toffee fudge. We retraced our steps to summon the little ferry, turning the board around so that the ferryman could see he had passengers from the other side of the river.I rarely go on a boat, so it’s always a delight to see the view from one.

Lot’s of interesting and very expensive properties on both sides.

and there’s Bayard’s Cove Fort again.

Nearly back to town. Just ten minutes or so on the water, and it feels like a different world.

They’re still crabbing, I’d be a bit nervous if my child was sitting there. We’ve missed lunch, so we stroll towards the little harbour to see what we can find. No lunch, just a pasty and some new sunglasses for me!

It takes less than an hour to walk from the town to the castle, even taking lots of photos and view stops. Even though it’s short, I know that Jo will like it, for the boats if nothing else. She likes to walk on Mondays, or with her lovely daughter, last week they went to Rufford Abbey near Nottingham

 

Black and white Sunday, typical

Driving around Dartmoor this evening, I spotted this Devon village green. It’s typical of the sort of place you find on the moor, with it’s Saxon stone cross. It looks as if nothing has changed for centuries, but apparently the cross was found in a barn and moved to the green in1985. It’s early Christian and has X’s and O’s engraved on it.

This is for Paula’s black and white Sunday typical theme, she has a dreamy image of Venice this week.

A transient cliff

West Bay in Dorset lies somewhere around half way along the Jurassic coast. The coast is a world heritage site, 95 miles long and 185 million years old.

So why am I showing you a picture of cliffs that old for a photo challenge theme of transient?

The cliffs are unstable in several places along the coast, West Bay has signs warning of rock slides just behind where people are enjoying the sun.

Quite a few years ago,  David Attenborough, the God of television nature documentaries, compared the age of our planet to the hours and minutes of a day. Apparently humankind arrived in the last minute of that day, and the planet is 4.54 billion years old. So not only are the people on this beach a mere blink of the Earth’s eye, but the crumbling cliffs are somewhat transient as well.

Turning Tides

My friend and I were at a craft fair today, Sandford Craft Fair took part in Credfest, a few miles from Exeter. The fair occupied the town square with live music on stage most of the day. One of the first performances were a vibrant group of musicians and singers, I could here but not see them from across the square, Later on I caught a couple of them dancing with their dragon and found out a little about them.

The Turning Tides project is a community interest company who believe that everyone has the right to equal access to music, the arts and life in. They work to make this a reality for people with ‘learning disabilities’ or ‘autism’ labels. The project’s core values are,

Encouragement to star-gaze

Freedom to follow dreams

Support to make dreams a reality

Opportunities to shine

Isn’t this wonderful? to learn more, maybe even volunteer if you’re local, visit TheTurningTidesProjectCIC on Facebook or the turning tides project

 

 

A Head Shot

I don’t take photos of people very often, mostly because I don’t want to be shouted at and asking takes away the casual air. A public event like a parade is always a good place to try, let’s face it, if you put yourself in the limelight there’s a chance someone will snap you!

Paula’s black and white Sunday theme this week is ‘Head shot’, I caught Mr Morris Man with an odd look on his face, he was mid jig. I quite like watch Morris dancing, but it seems they’re like Marmite, you either love them or hate them!