Hips and Haws

If you’re a certain age, you may have been given Rose Hip Syrup as a child. The bright red round and oval gems were used as a tonic to prevent winter colds because they’re rich in vitamin C. But did you also know they were baked in tarts, added to wine, marmalade and made into¬† soup? Best of all, they were used as anti varicose vein tea!

Now, the only thing I’ve ever done with haws is mix them with crab apples to make jelly, what about you? Well apparently, since Roman times the cheerful sprays of berries have been picked not just for jellies and jams, but to make wine and as a cure for the headaches that drinking might have caused! Women also gathered them for dyeing their hair, I touched mine up yesterday, I wonder if it’s worth a try.

I’ve always fancied myself as a medicine woman, a curandera, perhaps in a previous life.

Lens Artist Photo Challenge

On Saturday I took my sister and 5 year old nephew to town to check out the street festival that was taking place. There was lots to see but we didn’t have very much time.

My favourite dance troupe Kalash Tribal were there with some new routines.

Then this giant green beastie appeared!

My nephew Obi was amazed!

It wasn’t until later in the day that I saw Tina’s challenge this week is colourful, I could have taken lots more photos.

Lens-Artists Photo Challenge

Amy’s in the hot seat with this weeks challenge with the theme of Everyday moments, and she’s following in Monet’s footsteps in the Dutch countryside. It looks pretty wonderful too.

I’m closer to home, my local park, where on summer days people in their whites gather to play bowls. I can remember seeing them when I was at infant school, I always wanted to run across the impossibly smooth and green lawn.

Heavitree park was created in 1906, I suspect the slow, graceful game has been played there since the beginning.