Conceptual Photography

If you’re up for a really tricky photography challenge this week, Paula is the girl. Try your hand at conceptual photography she says.

Right.

What on earth is that? Well obviously it’s photography of a concept, she tells us. She’s added some links that explain, one, a wiki, says that it’s a type of photography that illustrates an idea.

While I was walking the dogs in the cemetery I went to visit my favourite tree, this Ginkgo. It was completely bare and I picked up a handful of it’s fan shaped leaves, thinking I could do something with them. There were many more fallen leaves, I compared their colours and the way they decayed and my mind kept returning to the word fallen. When I woke yesterday I had my idea, and this it.

Fallen

Does this photo meet Paula’s Thursday Special challenge? Are you ready to give it a try as well? In case you’re wondering, the original photo is also mine and has been featured here before.

Companionable

Walking through a field of large black and white Friesian cows can be a little anxiety provoking, if something spooks them and they stampede, it can be very risky, so much as I like them, I tend to keep my distance.

Never mind, my two favourite breeds of cattle are the Belted Galloway and these Highlands, both small breeds and even with horns there’s nothing scary about them. Highlands have been around since the 6th century, hardy little beasties that can tolerate very cold climates, and root around under snow to find food, on sparsely vegetated uplands.

They seem to thrive on Dartmoor, gathering in companionable groups, always with a benign look on their faces.

companionsIf you can find their faces beneath their shaggy overcoats!

Paula has give us five words to choose from as the theme for her Thursday Special, and i rather liked companionable. You can pop over and choose one for yourself if you’d like to join in, you’ll find  warm welcome.

Thursday Special, Deconstruction?

Paula at Lost in Translation has a really difficult challenge this week – for me anyway! She says that the way deconstruction applies to art is

‘Deconstruction is a way of understanding how something was created, usually things like art, books, poems and other writing. It means breaking something down into smaller parts. Deconstruction looks at the smaller parts that were used to create an object. The smaller parts are usually ideas.’

But is this art or science?OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAIn case you’re as mathematically minded a pea-brain as I am, this is a cryptogram.

Who thinks this ticks the box?

An Elusive Mountain

Paula at Lost in Translation has given us a list of five words to chose from for her Thursday Special this week. Her words are,

elusive

viscid

brilliant

profusion

and disorder

Flying over north east Borneo to Sabah, there’s good chance you’ll see Mount Kinabalu, unless you’re very fit, you’ll find it pretty elusive otherwise. Even seven years ago I wouldn’t have been fit enough to climb it, mountain are for looking at!

kinabalu

Taken from a plane window, this is isn’t the clearest image, if it was it wouldn’t be quite as elusive would it? 🙂

Paula would love to see you too, pop across and say hello.

 

A park for Paula

And any of my friends that want to play.

One of my favourite things as a child was to roly-poly down a grassy slope in the park, was it yours too? It isn’t actually that long since I last had a go. It was still fun, but would have been more comfortable if my plump places were distributed slightly differently. I’ll probably still do it again though.

Last year when my son and grandchildren had a go at Killerton Park, I took the photos instead.

park2There was definitely mischief in the air that day!

Paula wants to see your favourite park, large or small for her Thursday special.

Traces of the past

Paula is asking for images with traces of the past for her Thursday Special this week.

Troy Odeon

This is the Odeion at Troy in north west Anatolia, Turkey, it dates back to the Roman Troy 1X and was renovated in 124 AD, by Hadrian. I wonder if that was before or after he built the wall in the north of England, what a busy man. The Odeion has a semi-circular orchestra, surrounded by a wall of lime stone slabs, above which rise tiers of limestone seats, divided by aisles, into wedge shaped sections. Can you imagine the performances that took place there?  I’m sure you can still hear the echoes on a hot, still day. . .

Thanks Paula, I could do lots of posts for this theme.